Psychology and Counseling

Our psychology programs provide students with an in-depth understanding of human behavior, stressing its complexity, development, and integration. We are committed to a broad interdisciplinary study of humanity.

We offer state of the art training experiences in school and mental health counseling. In addition to our CACREP accredited school counseling programs, we offer the only CACREP accredited Mental Health Counseling (MHC) program in NEPA, and one of only two programs in a five state area!

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Chairperson: Edward J. Crawley, Ph.D.

About

The Department of Psychology and Counseling provides a range of programs designed to serve the interests and professional orientations of varied human service practitioners. Marywood has been involved in the preparation of psychologists, counselors, and other mental health professionals for over 50 years.
Specifically, the Department strives:

  1. To educate students in understanding the complexity and diversity of human behavior.
  2. To develop the ability to think critically, understand research, research methodology, techniques of data collection and analysis, and respect for scientifically derived knowledge.
  3. To educate students to develop and implement assessment and intervention strategies associated with individual and group behavior.
  4. To facilitate students’ understanding of the varied roles, obligations, and ethics of human service providers and researchers.
  5. To develop competencies to critically evaluate and contribute to research in the fields of psychology and counseling.

Programs have sufficient flexibility to permit individual students, under advisement, to plan part-time or full-time schedules appropriate to their individual needs and professional priorities. (Please note that the Psy.D. program is available only to fulltime students.) Competencies are developed through formal courses, independent study, and extensive supervised practica and internships, both on and off campus.

Student advisement and review are essential components of the overall training program. Trainee progress is monitored by the faculty during periodic student progress review sessions. In order to acquire the required competencies, a student may need more than the minimum credits required. The department has a long tradition of preparing professionals for service in the educational setting. Educational Specialist certificates and/or degree programs are available in K-12 school counseling; post-master’s certification, elementary and secondary school counseling; and school psychology. Those interested in a broader area of service may consider the Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling with an applied emphasis in diverse settings or Master of Arts in Psychology. Other psychology degree options are available for those who wish to develop a systematic understanding of human behavior for purposes of selfenrichment, pre-doctoral preparation, and other related purposes. Finally, a doctoral program leading to the Psy.D. (Doctor of Psychology) degree is offered.

Graduates of the Department of Psychology and Counseling have enjoyed excellent career opportunities and placements. Graduates are employed in institutions of higher education, public and private agencies, independent practices, and elementary or secondary schools throughout the eastern United States. In addition, graduates have gone on to receive doctoral degrees at major universities across the United States.

Master’s and Post-Master’s Certification Programs in Psychology and Counseling

Psychology Admission Requirements

Master's degree and certification students in Counseling or Psychology must meet the general admission requirements of the University. While a strong undergraduate background in psychology is preferred, capable students with coursework in general psychology, developmental psychology, and statistics will be considered.

All applicants must submit either a Miller Analogies Test score or a Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test score. Scores at or above the 50th percentile are preferred for the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Exam.  Three academic letters of recommendation are required. Additionally, degree applicants may be required to participate in an on-campus interview. No more than six credits earned prior to full admission may be applied to a degree in the Department of Psychology and Counseling.

Counseling Admission Requirements

Degree seeking students in Counseling must meet the general admission requirements of the University.

All applicants must submit either a Miller Analogies Test score or a Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test score. No more than six credits earned prior to full admission may be applied to a degree in the Department of Psychology and Counseling. Admission to the program is based upon a holistic review of undergraduate GPA, letters of recommendation, and test scores. Additionally, degree applicants may be required to participate in an on-campus interview.

Advisement

The faculty of the Department of Psychology and Counseling believe that advisement is a critical component of graduate training. As such, faculty are available to students during posted times. While the student's advisor is an essential part of the student's progress throughout the program, students are reminded that it is the student's responsibility to schedule appointments, to register for courses in a timely manner and to submit various departmental and graduate forms (Candidacy, Comprehensive Exams, Professional Contribution, Internship, and Graduation). Students should be very familiar with the Student Handbook in their program of study and consult with their advisor on a regular basis.

Counseling Candidacy and Degree Requirements

To be eligible for candidacy in Counseling, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Fulfill any and allAdmissions Committee requirements.
  2. Complete twelve credits at Marywood with a QPA of 3.00 or better.
  3. Apply for candidacy after completing twelve credits in the department.
  4. Submit a career goal statement.
  5. Receive departmental approval of a planned 60 credit program.
  6. Successful completion of semi-annual performance of academic, interpersonal, and professional behavior.

Degree requirements include a practicum, internship and final comprehensive examination. Details regarding these requirements can be found in course descriptions and in the Student Handbook.

Psychology Candidacy and Degree Requirements

To be eligible for candidacy in Psychology, all students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Fulfill all admission requirements. 
  2. Complete twelve credits at Marywood with a QPA of 3.00 or better (3.25 in Clinical Services).
  3. Submit candidacy application. 

Students seeking candidacy in the Clinical Services program must also provide the following at the time of candidacy:

  1. Goal statement reflecting their objectives and goals upon completion of the program and specific program in which the student intends to earn a degree.
  2. List of projected courses planned for the completion of the program, including anticipated dates of courses and projected completion date.
  3. Letter of support from a full-time Clinical faculty member (preferred) or a licensed psychologist.
  4. Competency rating form completed by a full-time Clinical faculty member (preferred) or a licensed psychologist.
  5. Appropriate clearances as detailed in the Department Handbook.

Students seeking candidacy in the Clinical Services program will also be required to complete a personal interview. Note that students are not formally accepted into the Clinical Services program until they have successfully completed candidacy review.

Degree requirements include completion of 48 credits, a comprehensive examination, and a closure experience (professional contribution, thesis, or internship). Details regarding these requirements can be found in course descriptions and in the Student Handbook.

Department Requirements and Student Handbook

Grade Point Average Requirement: If a Psychology or Counseling student’s QPA falls below a 3.00, that student is given one semester to bring his/her QPA up to 3.00. The Clinical Services program in the master’s program requires a minimum QPA of 3.25.

Students who plan to apply for doctoral training programs after completing their master's degrees are advised to review admissions requirements for the doctoral programs that they hope to attend. Graduation requirements at the master's level may or may not meet the requirements of admissions for specific doctoral programs. Students may need to select particular electives in order to meet doctoral admissions requirements.

Specific details regarding tentative two-year course schedules, course sequencing, program, and degree requirements are outlined in student handbooks for each program of study (Counseling Programs, M.A. Psychology and School Psychology Programs, Psy.D. Program). Students can access the handbook for their program of study through the department website and should consult their handbook to insure timely completion of the program.Students should check with their advisor for information regarding access to the Student Handbook for their program of study.

Endorsement Policy

The faculty of the Counseling programs limits its endorsement to those students who have completed one of the CACREP-based programs. Students will be endorsed only for the programs they have successfully completed.

Professional Conduct

The department requires students to conduct themselves as professionals-in-training. As such, students are expected to act in a manner that displays the highest regard for human dignity and ethical standards. This professional behavior is expected both in and out of the classroom.

Students with a Counseling major are required to adhere to the ethical code of the American Counseling Association (ACA). Students with a psychology major are required to adhere to the ethical code of the American Psychological Association (APA). Students with a school psychology major are required to adhere to the ethical code of the National Association of School Psychologists. Students in the Counseling, Clinical Services track, and School Psychology program are also required to demonstrate the requisite interpersonal and professional behavioral skills that the graduate faculty in these tracks determine to be essential to operate effectively as a clinician in contemporary society. Students who violate any of the ACA, APA, or NASP requirements or who fail to show the required interpersonal and professional behavioral skills may be placed on probation. In the case of egregious violations of ethical requirements, students may be dismissed immediately. Students who do not successfully complete the corrective action plan in the time frame articulated by the plan may be dismissed from the program. Students may dispute departmental decisions in this area by following the appeals procedures of the college. Further details about this policy are contained in the student handbooks that students receive upon matriculation into the Psychology and Counseling programs. 

As part of the candidacy review process, students in counseling programs and in the Clinical Services track in psychology will be expected to obtain clearances from the Pennsylvania State Police (criminal record clearance), the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare (child abuse and neglect clearance), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (fingerprint clearance); the department also reserves the right to require other local, state, or national clearance. Details are available in program handbooks. Students whose clearances come back with indications of a criminal record or an allegation of child abuse or neglect that was determined to be founded may be subject to a corrective action plan or dismissal from the program. Presence of a criminal record or founded instances of child abuse or neglect may prevent the student from completing practicum and internship courses.

Certification/Licensure

Current Pennsylvania State regulations require a minimum of sixty (60) graduate credits to be considered for licensure as a professional counselor. Further, Pennsylvania State regulations require a degree from a graduate program that requires a minimum of forty-eight (48) credits. In order to assist both Psychology and Counseling graduates to academically meet this qualification, the Psychology and Counseling Department offers a specialized licensure compliance program. The program is individualized for Psychology and Counseling graduates and is based on the educational requirements of the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) for counseling graduates or the North American Association of Masters in Psychology (NAMP) for psychology graduates. Credit requirements are solely based on the individual graduate’s needs. The Licensure  Compliance program is open to both Marywood and non-Marywood graduates. For further information, contact the department.

A student enrolled in the Master’s of Arts in Psychology with aspirations to become a Licensed Professional Counselor in Pennsylvania is advised to complete the 48 credit program and consult with his/her advisors and with the Pennsylvania Department of State licensing board for Professional Counseling (http://www.dos.state.pa.us/bpoa), so as to facilitate the most efficient completion of licensing requirements. Students who graduate from the 48 credit psychology program will need to complete additional practicum and internship experiences in Counseling and a minimum of 12 additional graduate credits in order to meet licensing requirements to become a Licensed Professional Counselor in Pennsylvania. More information about licensing issues is presented in the Student Handbook.

The Master of Science in K-12 School Counseling and the Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling are 60 graduate credit programs. Students in either program meet the academic requirements for Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Pennsylvania. Note that these standards require supervised counseling experience after earning the degree and passing a national licensing exam (NCE).

The K-12 School Counseling, and Mental Health Counseling Programs are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP). Graduates from these programs thus meet all requirements for National Certified Counselor (NCC) status and can complete the NCC certification examination immediately upon completion of the program.

Psychological Services Center

The Psychology and Counseling Department operates a training clinic, the Psychological Services Center (PSC), which provides quality, low cost mental health services to the university and local communities while providing students with supervised training as part of their graduate studies in Psychology and Counseling. As part of their training, students in the master's programs of the department may be asked to assess and treat clients in the PSC, under appropriate supervision, to meet course requirements. Final determination of course requirements in this regard lies with individual course instructors in consultation with the PSC Director.

Counseling Programs

Master of Science in Counselor Education (School Counseling): The K-12 School Counseling program, leading to the Master of Science in Counselor Education degree program, leading to the Master of Science in Counselor Education degree, is designed to provide the counselor-in-training with the personal and professional skills necessary for developing competencies in individual and group counseling, consultation, educational planning, and career development. It meets the certification requirements of the Pennsylvania Department of Education for Educational Specialist I.

Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling: Prepares counselors for careers in settings such as mental health, child welfare, and family counseling agencies; institutions for the aging; employment and personnel offices; parishes; college counseling centers; and fields dealing with chemical dependency and other addictions.

Master of Science in Counselor Education

K-12 School Counseling Program — Certification: Educational Specialist I

60 semester hours

I. COUNSELING CONCENTRATION COURSES

42 semester hours

COUN 505 Career Development I
3
*COUN 518 Applied Practice I
3
COUN 525 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
3
COUN 530 Ethics and Professional Development
3
COUN 531 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology 3
COUN 532 Multicultural Issues for Counseling Professionals
3
COUN 543 Group Process in Counseling
3
*COUN 544 Counseling Techniques
3
COUN 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing
3
EDUC 501 Research Theory 3
EDUC 561 Methods, Materials and Assessment in Teaching ESL 3
EDUC 514 Human Development 3
SPED 507 Characteristics of the Mildly Impaired
3
SPED 539 Behavioral Management Approaches 3

II. SPECIALIZATION COURSES

12 semester hours

COUN 510 Principles and/Practices of Professional School Counseling 3
COUN 540 Developing a Successful School Counseling Program 3
COUN 535 Consultation, Collaboration, and Critical Issues 3
Elective   3

III. FIELDWORK COURSES

6 semester hours

COUN 500 Field Placement Prep 0
*COUN 522 Applied Practices II: K-12 School Counseling 3
*COUN 522A Applied Practices II: K-12 School Counseling (Supervision) 0
COUN 560 Internship in K-12 School Counseling 3

* “B” grade required

Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling

60 semester hours

I. CORE COURSES

6 semester hours

PSYC 501 Research Methods 3
PSYC 514 Human Development
3

II. COUNSELING CONCENTRATION

42 semester hours

COUN 500 Field Placement Prep
0
COUN 505 Career Development
3
COUN 507 Principles and Practices of Mental Health Counseling
3
*COUN 518 Applied Practice I
3
COUN 525 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
3
COUN 530 Ethics and Professional Development
3
COUN 532 Multicultural Issues for Counseling Professionals
3
COUN 543 The Group Process in Counseling
3
*COUN 544 Counseling Techniques
3
*COUN 557 Applied Practice II in Counseling
3
*COUN 552A,B,C,D Internship in Mental Health Counseling
3 total
COUN 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing
3
COUN 584 Marital Counseling and Therapy
3
COUN 586 Chemical Dependence 3
PSYC 531 Psychopathology  3

* “B” grade required

III. ELECTIVES

12 semester hours

Twelve credits are taken in counselor or related disciplines, depending on the experiential background, interests, and professional goals of the student.

Suggested Counseling Electives

COUN 538 Psychopharmacology
3
COUN 582 Counseling the Abuser of Drugs and Alcohol
3
COUN 586
Chemical Dependency 3

Psychology and other University courses can be elected with the advice of and/or permission of the student's advisor and the program director.

Sequence of Counseling Courses

Students are reminded that certain courses are sequential and may not be taken out of sequence. Students are not permitted to take Applied Practice II and Internship simultaneously. Students who are seeking their M.A. degrees in Mental Health Counseling must complete their degrees prior to applying for and enrolling in school certification programs. The counseling sequence is:

COUN 518 Applied Practice
COUN 525 Theories of Counseling & Psychotherapy
COUN 544 Counseling Techniques
COUN 522/COUN 545 Applied Practice II
COUN 522/524/551/552/560 Internship

Certain courses (i.e., COUN 545, COUN 522) are not available during summer sessions. Some courses (i.e., COUN 535) are summer only courses. Internship (excluding M.A. program) course availability is variable during summer sessions.

Full-time students in the Counseling Programs should expect to spend a minimum of five (5) academic semesters in order to complete their degree requirements. Admission to Applied Practice II and Internship require permission of the academic advisor or Applied Practice/Internship instructor. All degree students must take a minimum of six credit hours (part-time) or nine credit hours (full-time) per semester and follow the program cohort model (see Counseling Programs Student Handbook for details).

Psychology Programs

Graduate study in Psychology at Marywood attempts to provide the student with an in-depth view of the scientific foundations and professional applications of the discipline. The curriculum serves the needs of students who wish to apply psychological principles and techniques in varied professional settings. The master's level program is also an appropriate preparation for those who wish to pursue further study at the School Psychology (Ed.S.) or doctoral level in a more specialized area. Program concentrations leading to the Master of Arts in Psychology are available in the following areas:

  • General/Theoretical Psychology
  • Clinical Services 

A. General/Theoretical Concentration (48 credits)

This concentration is intended for those students who wish to develop a broad-based understanding of psychology for varied purposes (not necessarily involving clinical applications). Students complete 21 credits in the core courses as detailed below and select an appropriate set of elective courses from available department offerings with the approval of an advisor. The Closure Experience requirement for this concentration may involve either Psychology 554/556.

I. CORE COURSES

21 semester hours

PSYC 503 Research Methods and Statistics I
3
PSYC 504 Research Methods and Statistics II
3
PSYC 508 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
PSYC 514 Human Development
3
OR
PSYC 518 Advanced Human Development
3
PSYC 517 Personality Psychology
3
PSYC 521 Social Psychology
3
PSYC 522 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior
3
OR
PSYC 523 Contemporary Learning Theories
3

B. Clinical Services Concentration 

(48 credits)

This concentration is intended for those who wish to function in a mental health agency or other human services setting where the psychologist provides a range of consultative, assessment, and therapeutic functions. In consultation with the advisor, selection of electives in this concentration may focus on specific client populations and areas of expertise. A course of studies can be designed that emphasizes work with children and adolescents and/or work with adults. Students considering admission into the Psy.D. program at the post-master's level should apply for admission into the Clinical Services program. Choice of electives and their sequencing should be discussed with the advisor and/or chairperson.

 

II. Assessment and Diagnostic Methods (9 credits minimum)

PSYC 531 Psychopathology (required)
3
OR    
PSYC 532 Child Psychopathology (required)
3
PSYC 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing (required) 3
PSYC 562 Cognitive Assessment (elective)
3
PSYC 580 Assessment of Adult Personality and Psychopathology (required)
3
OR    
PSYC 581 Socio-emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents (required)
3

III. Intervention Methods (9 credits minimum)

* PSYC 571 Individual Psychotherapy (required)
3
* PSY 577 Practicum (required)
3
* COUN 518 Applied Practice I (elective)2
3
COUN 584 Marital Counseling and Therapy (elective)
3
PSYC 572 Group Psychotherapy (elective)
3
PSYC 573 Therapy with Children (elective)
3
PSYC 574 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (elective)
3

* “B” grade required for this course. 

IV. Electives (3-9 credits)

Selection of elective courses in the department is in consultation with the advisor.

V. Closure Experience (0-6 credits)

Students, in consultation with their advisor and the department chairperson, may select one of the three alternatives listed below to meet the Closure Experience requirements of this concentration. Two of these (PSY 556, 578) are credit-bearing courses which reduce the number of elective credits from nine to six (see above).

PSYC 554 Master’s Thesis Preparation 0-3
PSYC 555 Professional Contribution
0
PSYC 556 Master’s Thesis
3
PSYC 578 Internship (variable credit, 3 credit minimum)
3

Students should note that the internship option requires permission of the advisor and the department chairperson. Further details regarding these alternatives are available in the Student Handbook.

Students are encouraged to complete core courses early in their program of study.

The program stresses development of competencies. Alternate courses may be approved for those who can demonstrate competency in a required area. Test-out procedures should be discussed with the advisor or department chairperson for those who seek course waivers of required courses. The student should understand that program adjustments will not diminish the number of credits required for a degree; they will, however, allow the student to take more advanced specialty courses as part of the program of study.

Psychology students are encouraged to take their comprehensive examinations upon completion of the seven required courses. Further details regarding the comprehensive exam are available in the Student Handbook.

C. School Psychology Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) Degree Program

The Marywood University Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) Program in School Psychology is interdisciplinary in nature and is intended for students who seek state certification as a K-12, school psychologist. The Ed.S. degree program is designed as a 75 graduate credit program for students who wish to work in schools or related agencies. Students will follow an integrated and sequential course of study beginning post baccalaureate, earn a Master of Arts degree in psychology, complete the Educational Specialist degree and then are recommended for state certification. The integrated and sequential program is based on national standards and the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) standards.

The program is competency-based and aims to train professionals who can provide the wide range of services expected of school psychologists. Emphasis throughout the program is on a realistic integration of didactic instruction and experiential learning, with the candidate expected to demonstrate continual progress toward independent professional functioning.

Students may enter the program post baccalaureate or post master's degree. Those seeking entrance post baccalaureate, earn the Master of Arts degree in Psychology upon completion of 45 credit hours and other degree requirements for the General Theoretical concentration. Applicants seeking admission post-master's should expect to complete a minimum of 30 graduate credits. The applicability of prior graduate coursework will be evaluated in writing by the director of the School Psychology Program. Full-time students should expect to complete the program, including a 1,200-hour internship, within three academic years. Part-time students, entering post baccalaureate, are expected to complete the program and internship hours within five years. Part-time students are expected to enroll in a minimum of 15 credits per academic year. All students will be admitted annually for the fall semester only. The Field Work Experience of at least 1,200 contact hours is required. The Educational Specialist in School Psychology program is fully approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

Educational Specialist in School Psychology Program Admission Requirements

  1. A bachelor's or master's degree in a related area.
  2. All undergraduate and graduate transcripts (minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25).
  3. GRE
  4. A personal statement citing the applicant's reasons for entering the profession of school psychology and giving an estimate of potential for success in the field. Include a resume of the applicant's professional experience (if any).
  5. A personal interview with the school psychology program committee.
  6. All application materials must be received by the application deadline.

 

Those admitted to the program are expected to demonstrate continued professional growth. The progress of each candidate is reviewed yearly.

Each School Psychology student is required to complete the following course of studies.To be recommended for certification, a student must also: pass the PAPA (Reading, Math, Writing) and Praxis II (School Psychology) standardized examinations. Note: Program requirements and curricula are subject to change, pending Pennsylvania Department of Education Regulations and NASP Training Standards.

I. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND DEVELOPMENT

15 semester hours

PSYC 508 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
PSYC 514 Human Development
3
PSYC 517 Personality Psychology
3
PSYC 521 Social Psychology
3
PSYC 522 Cognitive/Affection Bases of Behavior
3

II. NATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY OF EXCEPTIONALITY

9 semester hours

PSYC 532 Child Psychopathology
3
SPED 507 Characteristics and Remedial Strategies
3
SPED 511 Curriculum Adaptations for Special-Needs Learner
3

III. ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES

12 semester hours

PSYC 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing
3
PSYC 562 Cognitive Assessment
3
PSYC 563 Assessment of Learning
3
PSYC 581 Socio-Emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents
3

IV. INTERVENTION PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES

12 semester hours

COUN 518 Applied Practice I
3
COUN 532 Multicultural Issues for Counseling
3
PSYC 585 Family-School Interventions
3
SPED 539 Behavioral Management Approaches
3
OR    
PSYC 539 Behavioral Management 3

V. SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

15 semester hours

PSYC 551 School Psychology Law and Ethics
3
PSYC 552 School Based Consultation Methods
3
PSYC 549 Fieldwork Experience
5
PSYC 549A
Practicum
3
PSYC 549B
Internship
3
PSYC 549c Internship 3

VI. CURRICULUM AND ORGANIZATION IN EDUCATION

3 semester hours

PSYC 547 Introduction to School Psychology
3

VII. RESEARCH AND STATISTICS

6 semester hours

PSYC 503 Research Methodology and Statistics I
3
PSYC 504 Research Methodology and Statistics II
3
PSYC 555 Professional Contribution
0
OR
PSYC 554 Thesis Preparation 0-3
AND
PSYC 556 Master's Thesis 0-3

Transfer Credits

All credits transferred must reflect at least a “B” grade, be from a regionally accredited institution, be similar in content and demand of equivalent Marywood courses, and have been earned within the preceding 5 years. The Director of School Psychology must approve all transfer credits. The following criteria also must be met:

 

  • The student has attained Full Acceptance Status in the program. 
  • The student has provided a syllabus of the proposed transfer course. 
  • The student has provided an official transcript showing an earned grade of “B” level or above in the course(s) to be transferred. Grades lower than “B” are not transferable. 
  • The student completed the transfer courses in the past five years prior to making this request. 
  • The student met with his/her academic advisor who will make a recommendation of approval of transfer. 
  • Transfer students applying at the master’s level must complete 75% of the required coursework for the master’s degree through Marywood University. 
  • Transfer students applying at the Ed.S. level can transfer a maximum of 9 graduate credits of the required coursework for the Ed.S. degree through Marywood University. Transfer credits will not be applied to the following courses:
    • PSY 549a Practicum 
    • PSY 549b Internship 
    • PSY 549c Internship 
    • PSY 551 School Psychology Law and Ethics
    • PSY 562 Cognitive Assessment
    • PSY 563 Assessment of Learning 
    • PSY 581 Social Emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents 

Final written approval is made by the Director of School Psychology with copies of the final determination placed in the student's file and mailed to the student.

Course Sequence

Upon entering the Educational Specialist Program post baccalaureate, students work to complete the requirements for the Master's of Arts Degree in General Theoretical Psychology and gradually enroll in courses specific to school psychology certification. The MA degree is earned after completion of 45 core-credits and a professional contribution or Thesis (see General Theoretical Concentration). Afterwards, students continue to enroll in courses, university based practica, and internship specific to the satisfying requirements for Educational Specialist degree.

Internship Guidelines

PSY 549A-Practicum is completed the semester immediately prior to the field-based internship experience (PSY 549B, PSY 549C). Students who do not enroll in PSY 549B the semester immediately following PSY 549A are required to retake PSY 549A during regular schedule in the upcoming academic year. Students earning a grade of C+ or lower in PSY 549A are ineligible to begin the 1200 hour field based internship the following semester and a Corrective Action Plan will be automatically developed.

The Director of the School Psychology program provides guidance in students’ selection of field based internship sites (PSY 549B, PSY549C). Field based internship sites must be approved the Director of the School Psychology Program prior to mailing of the memorandum of understanding to the site. To be eligible for the internship experience, the student must have passed the PAPA, successfully completed all coursework requirements (including PC/thesis), and been awarded a master’s degree. The 1200 hour internship is completed on a full time basis over the course of one academic year. The internship experience begins only in the fall semester. Students are not permitted to complete the internship experience at a site where they attended school, are/were employed, and/or are a relative or friend to a site stakeholder.

Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology

Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program (Psy.D.)

Consistent with the mission of the University, the APA-accredited* Clinical Psychology Doctoral program endeavors to train high quality students to provide state-of-the-art, ethical, humane, and culturally-sensitive clinical services to diverse populations in contemporary society. On the way to earning a Psy.D. in clinical psychology, the program model teaches students to be research-informed practitioners with general skills who pursue development in specific areas through the selection of electives, practicum sites, research topics, internships, and post-doctoral training. The specific goals of the program are as follows:

  1. To provide students with foundational knowledge of the field of psychology in general, and clinical psychology in particular.
  2. To teach students to view themselves as being life-long learners while also giving them the skills necessary to be critical and sophisticated consumers of research so that they may be able to independently and effectively apply future developments in the field to clinical practice.
  3. To help students advance from novice to the early stages of competent clinician status in assessment, intervention, and supervision/consultation.
  4. To prepare students for the realities of clinical practice in contemporary society and to inspire them to be mission-driven psychologists who try to advance both the organizations in which they are employed and the profession at large.
  5. To train students to be appreciative of both cultural and individual differences in both their attitudes and in their practice so that they may be effective clinical psychologists in an increasingly diverse and interdependent world.

 

*For further information about the accreditation status of this program, please contact the APA Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, American Psychological Association, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242. Phone: 202-336-5979.

Psy.D. Program Philosophy and Training Model

In accordance with Marywood University's tradition of service, the clinical psychology doctoral program follows the Vail model, training students to be scholarpractitioners. The Psy.D. program includes foundation courses in psychology and both academic and applied training in the substantive area of clinical psychology. The use of empirically-supported assessments and intervention techniques is emphasized, as well as a focus on outcome assessment. Although not designed to produce researchers, the Psy.D. program teaches students to be educated consumers of research. To reach this goal, they have both academic training and personal experience in research and statistics.An empirical master’s thesis or professional contribution is required, as well as a doctoral project which is empirically-based. In addition, students complete three courses in research and statistics. This strong scholarship component is consistent with our scholar-practitioner model, as opposed to the more practice-oriented practitioner-scholar or local clinical scientist models.

Typically, eight students are admitted annually at the post-bachelor's level. These students are in residence for four years prior to internship and are awarded a master's degree (M.A. in Psychology, Clinical Services) upon degree requirement completion, typically after their second year. As the curriculum is very structured and sequential, we accept only up to 15 transfer credits which may be applied toward the master's degree. These credits must be approved by the Director of Clinical Training.

Admission Application Process

See the application materials for deadline and mailing address information. All applicants must provide the completed application form, official undergraduate/graduate transcripts, 3 letters of recommendation (at least 2 from psychologists), and a personal statement. All these materials must be sent by the application deadline. The general GRE (taken within the last 5 years) is required for post-bachelor’s admission applicants, and scores must be received by the application deadline.

Prerequisites

Admission to the Psy.D. program requires at least 18 credits of Psychology coursework at the undergraduate level, including: statistics, experimental methods/research design, and abnormal/psychopathology. A major in Psychology is preferred. A minimum overall GPA of 3.30 on a 4.00 scale is expected, for both general curriculum and Psychology courses. 

Transfer Credits

Up to 15 transfer credits in graduate Psychology coursework will be accepted. All credits transferred must reflect at least a "B" grade, be from a regionally accredited institution, be similar in content and demand of equivalent Marywood courses, and have been earned within the preceding five years. The Director of Clinical Training must approve all transfer credits.

Admission Post-Master’s

Up to two students will be accepted annually at post-master’s degree in psychology, to join the third year doctoral students. Students must have completed their degrees no more than five years prior to application. Demonstrated excellence in academics and clinical work is expected. Applicants also must have completed an empirical master’s thesis or professional contribution (or equivalent) at the graduate institution. Students accepted post-master’s must pass the Marywood Master’s Comprehensive Exam upon admission, or demonstrate that they have successfully passed this examination if they earned their Master’s degree at Marywood. Two of the applicant's letters of recommendation must be from full-time graduate Psychology faculty at the institution where the master's degree was completed. All other application procedures are the same as for the post-bachelor's admissions. Preference will be given to students who completed their psychology master's degree in the clinical services or the clinical child/school track at Marywood University, to assure that all master's level coursework and experiences are consistent with the Marywood Psy.D. total program.

For a post-master's application to be considered, all of the following courses (or their equivalent) must have been completed at the master's level (unless otherwise indicated) with a grade of "B" or better:

PSYC 503 Research and Statistics I
3
PSYC 504 Research and Statistics II
3
PSYC 508 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
PSYC 514 Human Development
3
PSYC 517 Personality Theories
3
PSYC 521 Social Psychology
3
PSYC 522 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior
3
PSYC 531 Psychopathology
3
PSYC 532 Child Psychopathology
3
AND    
PSYC 580 Assessment of Adult Personality and Psychopathology 3
PSYC 556 Master’s Thesis
3
OR    
PSYC 555 Professional Contribution  
PSYC 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing
3
PSYC 571 Introduction to Individual Psychotherapy
3
PSYC 574 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
3
PSYC 577 Practicum I
3
PSYC 587 Practicum II
3
OR    
PSYC 578 Internship
3

Advisement and Student Progress Evaluation

With the exception of electives, the curriculum plan for each student is structured by the Director of Clinical Training at the time of admission and implemented by the student's academic advisor. Annual written evaluations of the student's progress in the program are provided by the Director of Clinical Training, who is available to every student for consultation or advisement. Community practicum and internship site preparation and selection, as well as academic advising, occur under the guidance ofthe Associate Director of Clinical Training.

Continuation in the Psy.D. program is contingent upon: successful completion of coursework and other program requirements, conduct that is ethical and professional, and demonstration of appropriate clinical aptitude and skills. A Corrective Action Plan will be implemented, should there be significant areas of concern in the student's performance. Refer to the Psy.D. Student Handbook for further information. (http://www.marywood.edu/psych-couns/psyd)

Curriculum

The Psy.D. curriculum is sequential, cumulative, increasing in complexity, and designed to prepare the student for further formal training.The program requires 117 total credits: (52.5 at the master’s level; 64.5 doctoral credits).

The Psy.D. program is full-time, with required coursework scheduled during daytime and evening hours within the traditional two academic semesters (fall, spring).Professional Ethics (PSYC 700), a required course, is offered in the summer via an online format. Students may choose to fulfill some of their electives during the summer months, as well.

The three-semester (7.5 credits) on-campus practicum series builds from initial work in the Psychological Services Center (PSC) to later work in the Counseling and Student Development Center during the third year, and the provision of clinical supervision to junior Psy.D. students on work in the clinic in the fourth year. Additionally, students are involved in a two-semester community-based practicum in their fourth year of training.

The Psy.D. curriculum includes significant training in both assessment and intervention strategies. The curriculum builds from foundation courses to more specific application courses and experiences. There are opportunities for coursework and applied practice with children, adolescents, and adults. Required courses allow for training as a generalist, with elective selection providing the opportunity for focus on child or adult populations.The Psy.D. program emphasizes evidenced-based interventions, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy. Students are also exposed to other therapeutic approaches, including humanistic and couple/family therapy.

The Marywood Psy.D. program follows the guidelines for clinical training as set forth by the American Psychological Association and the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology.

Licensure and Credentialing

The Psy.D. program meets the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards/National Register of Health Services Providers in Psychology "Guidelines for Defining 'Doctoral Degree in Psychology.'" Therefore, graduates of this designated program who decide to apply for licensing as psychologists typically will meet the educational requirements for licensing. However, in each jurisdiction there are additional requirements that must be satisfied. For exact information, please contact the state or provincial licensing board in the jurisdiction in which you plan to apply.

Once licensed, graduates are eligible to apply for credentialing as a Health Service Provider in Psychology. Graduation from a designated program ensures that the program you completed meets the educational requirements for credentialing by the National Register. However, there are additional requirements that must be satisfied prior to being credentialed by the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology©. For further information, consult the National Registers' website: www.nationalregister.org.

Comprehensive Examination

Upon completion of the master's foundational core courses (21 credits), typically at the end of the second year, students are required to pass the Comprehensive Examination, consisting of questions from each of the seven core courses. This Comprehensive Examination must be completed for receipt of the master's degree and for continuation in the doctoral program. Refer to the Psy.D. Student Handbook for further information.

Qualifying Clinical Examination

At the end of the third year, students are required to pass a Qualifying Clinical Examination (QCE), involving a written case study presentation and oral examination by clinical Psy.D. faculty. Students are required to successfully pass the QCE prior to accepting an internship offer. Refer to the Psy.D. Student Handbook for further information about the QCE.

Sample Schedule

Year 1
Fall Semester (15 credits)

PSYC 503 Research Methods and Statistics I
3
PSYC 508 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
PSYC 531 Psychopathology
3
PSYC 559A Prepracticum 3
PSYC 561 Introduction to Psychological Testing
3
PSYC 572 Introduction to Group Psychotherapy
3

Spring Semester (12 credits)

PSYC 504 Research Methods and Statistics II
3
PSYC 517 Personality Psychology
3
PSYC 522 Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behavior
3
PSYC 554A Master's Thesis Preparation 0
OR    
PSYC 555 Professional Contribution 0
PSYC 564 Introductory Prepracticum
1.5
PSYC 571 Introduction to Individual Psychotherapy
3

Summer 1 (3 credits)

PSYC 700 Professional Ethics
3

Year 2
Fall Semester (15 credits)

PSYC 518 Advanced Human Development
3
PSYC 521 Social Psychology
3
PSYC 532 Child Psychopathology
3
PSYC 554B Master’s Thesis Proposal
0
OR    
  Continuation of Professional Contribution 0
PSYC 574 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
3
PSYC 577 Practicum
3

Spring Semester (15 credits)

PSYC 556 Master’s Thesis
3
PSYC 562 Cognitive Assessment
3
PSYC 580 Assessment of Adult Personality and Psychopathology
3
PSYC 587 Practicum II
3
PSYC 815 Child Psychotherapy
3
DEAN 056 Graduate Degree Candidacy/RCEHD (M.A.)
0

Year 3
Fall Semester (13.5 credits)

PSYC 611 Advanced Statistical Analysis I
3
PSYC 704 Multicultural Issues in Psychology
3
PSYC 805 Interpersonal Intervention Strategies
3
PSYC 850 Educational Assessment Practicum 1.5
PSYC 880A Community Practicum I 3

Spring Semester (12 credits)

PSYC 706 Supervision and Consultation Seminar
1.5
PSYC 851 Geriatric Assessment Practicum 1.5
PSYC 880B Community Practicum I 3
PSYC 801 Advanced Psychopharmacology 3
  Elective
3

Year 4
Fall Semester (12 credits)

PSYC 870 Practicum V
3
PSYC 881A Community Practicum II
3
PSYC 895A Doctoral Project
3
  Elective 3

Spring Semester (15 credits)

PSYC 802 Marital and Family Therapy
3
PSYC 871 Practicum VI
3
PSYC 881B Community Practicum II
3
PSYC 895B Doctoral Project
3
  Elective 3

Year 5
Fall Semester (3 credit)

PSYC 897A Internship (Predoctoral)
5

Spring Semester (3 credit)

PSYC 897B Internship (Predoctoral)
3

Psychology and Counseling Website