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Music, Theatre, and Dance: Student Handbook

MTD Student Handbook  

The information in this handbook is designed to familiarize you with university and department policies specific to the MTD degree programs. Please save this handbook, as it will provide guidance throughout your studies at Marywood. Bring this handbook to all academic advising sessions.

Updated May 2013

Introduction 6
Mission of the University 6
Core Values 6
Mission of Music, Theatre, & Dance Department                              6
Degree and Program Offerings 7
Contact Information 8
GENERAL INFORMATION                                                               10
I. Entrance Audition 10
II. Placement/Place-out Tests 10
III. Pre-Requisites and Requirements 10
  A. Music Theory Sequence 10
  B. Piano Proficiency Exam 10
  C. Applied Lessons 11
  D. Practice Requirements 11
  E. Juries 11
  F. Performance Requirements 12
  G. "Wednesdays-at-Three" 12
  H. "Fridays-at-Two" 12
IV. Attendance Policies 13
  A. Courses 13
  B. Applied Lessons 13
  C. Ensembles 13
  D. Student/Faculty Department Meetings 13
  E. Concert/Production Attendance Requirement 13
V. Academic Grades/Status 14
  A. Grade Requirements 14
  B. Tutoring 14
  C. Repeated Courses 14
  D. Academic Probation 14
  E. Incompletes 14
  F. Leave of Absence 14
  G. Dismissal from University 14
VI. Academic Honesty 15
  A. Cheating 15
  B. Plagiarism 15
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS                                                      16
I. All MTD Degree Programs 16
  A. Reserving Recital/Production Venues 16
  B. Maintenance Requests 16
II. Music Degree Recitals 16
  A. Recital Parameters 16
  B. Concert Attire 17
  C. Recital Jury (music majors only) 17
  D. Recital Accompanists 17
  E. Recital Program Protocol 17
III. Theatre Degree Senior Projects (Productions) 18
  A. Theatre; Theatre education 7-12 18
  B. Musical Theatre 18
  C.Arts Administration/Primary concentration: Theatre 18
  D. Capstone Program Playbill Protocol 18
IV. Additional Information Specific to Degree 18
  A. Student teaching: Music K-12; Theatre 7-12 18
  B. Internship: Music therapy 18
ACADEMIC ADVISING/COUNSELING                                              19
I. Advisement Process for All Programs 19
  A. Undergraduate Catalog as Contract 19
  B. Academic Advisor 19
  C. Accommodations for Students with Documented Disabilities    19
II. Additional Advisement: Music K-12; Theatre 7-12 20
  A. Field Office Contact 20
  B. Sophomore Screening Process 20
III. Co-Curricular Transcripts 20
UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULAR GUIDES                                        21
I. Liberal Arts Core Curriculum 21
  A. Old Core Curriculum Template (entry prior to 2010) 21
  B. New Core Curriculum Template (43-46 credits) 22
II. Curricular Guides for MTD degrees/programs 23
  A.  Bachelor of Music (BM) degree
    1. Music education K-12 24
    2. Music therapy 25
    3. Music performance 26
  B. Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree
    1. Musical theatre 28
    2. Theatre 29
    3. Communication Arts/Theatre Education 7-12 30
    4. Arts Administration (Collaborative degree)
      a) Music: primary or secondary concentration 31
      b) Theatre: primary or secondary concentration 31
  C. Opportunities for Non-MTD Majors  
    1. Minor Specializations  
      a) Minor in Music - 18 credits 32
      b) Minor in Theatre - 18 credits 32
      c) Minor in Dance - 18 credits 32
    2. Undeclared major (with interest in music or theatre) 33
MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 34
I. Performing Ensembles 34
  A. Music 34
  B. Theatre 34
  C. Dance 34
  D. Ensemble Credit Requirements                                                34
II. Storage Spaces 34
  A. Personal Items/Equipment 34
  B. Instrument Lockers 34
III. Practice Spaces 35
  A. Practice Rooms and Classrooms 35
  B. Large-Ensemble Rehearsal Spaces 35
IV. Computer Labs 35
  A. Computer Lab/Classroom (1st floor) 35
  B. Electronic Music Lab (2nd floor) 35
V. MTD Student Ambassadors 35
VI. Honor Society/Collegiate Clubs 36
  A. Pi Kappa Lambda 36
  B. Music education - NAfME Collegiate 36
  C. Music therapy - AMTA 36
  D. Theatre - Marywood Players 36


HEALTH & SAFETY INFORMATION FOR STUDENT MUSICIANS 37
Introduction  
Performance injuries  
Advice for instrumentalists  
Advice for vocalists  
Advice for all musicians  
Instrument Hygiene  
Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)  
APPENDIX A - Application for Course Place-Out Examination             46
APPENDIX B - Concert/Production Attendance Requirement 47
APPENDIX C - Co-Curricular Transcript Worksheet 48
APPENDIX D - MTD Computer Lab Policy 50
APPENDIX E - MTD Program Template for Performances 51
APPENDIX F - Music Recital Checklist 53
APPENDIX G - Theatre Production Checklist 54

                                      

INTRODUCTION

As performing arts majors and minors, you are encouraged to explore the opportunities offered to you in our classrooms, studios, rehearsals, and performances. Whatever your level of experience is when you arrive at Marywood, we challenge you to discover your strengths, expand your skills, and develop your talents as performing artists. Whether you aspire to be an actor, educator, dancer, solo performer, arts administrator, therapist, or technical director you are a valued member of our department and we are delighted you chose Marywood University for your education.                                  

Mission of Marywood University

A Catholic university sponsored by the Congregation of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Marywood University roots itself in the principles of justice and a belief that education empowers people. Enacting its ideals, Marywood offers students a welcoming and supportive community that encourages men and women of all backgrounds to shape their lives as leaders in service to others. Proud of its liberal arts tradition and host of professional disciplines, Marywood challenges students to broaden their understanding of global issues and to make decisions based on spiritual, ethical, and religious values. Marywood calls upon students to seek their full potential and invites all to engage in a lifelong process of learning. Witnessing the efficacy of teaching and scholarship, Marywood University educates students to live responsibility in a diverse and interdependent world.

University Core Values

1) Catholic Identity - spiritual, ethical, intellectual values in the context of a faith community 

2) Respect for Each Person - the value of each human being; for diversity in the context of vibrant community

3) Empowerment - education to enable access and to empower the underserved

4) Service - learning and scholarship in service of the global community

5) Commitment to Excellence - education has the capacity to forward the kingdom of God 

Mission of the Music, Theatre, and Dance Department

In keeping with the University’s mission and commitment to academic excellence, students learn professional and leadership skills necessary for various careers in the performing arts. The mission of the Music, Theatre, and Dance department is to foster spiritual, ethical, and religious values while simultaneously providing educational, performing arts experiences as we prepare our students to become leaders in a diverse and interdependent world.

Degree and Program Offerings

 Undergraduate degrees

Bachelor of Music - Music education; Music therapy; Music performance

Bachelor of Arts - Musical theatre; Theatre; Communication Arts 7-12/Theatre education

Collaborative degrees                                                        

Bachelor of Arts - Arts administration

(primary and secondary concentrations offered in music or theatre)

Teacher certification

Music education K-12; Theatre education 7-12

Minor (18-credits)

Marywood University students may choose to pursue a particular area of interest outside of the designated undergraduate degree program: the minor area of study. Students complete 18-credits of specific course work in either music, theatre, or dance, which provide an overview of that discipline.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

MTD DEPARTMENT AND UNIVERSITY OFFICES

Students are required to provide updated contact information (email, local phone number, local address) to the MTD department office at the beginning of each academic year. Marywood students receive a university email account and are expected to check it regularly for any MTD department and University-wide electronic messages.

Department website: http://www.marywood.edu/mtd

MTD main office (570) 348-6268 Patricia Durkan, administrative assistant
Department chair (570) 348-6268 x2531   Joan McCusker, IHM, Ph.D.
FAX: (570) 961-4751  
MTD Programs Directors    
Music therapy x2527 Anita L. Gadberry, Ph.D., MT-BC
Theatre x2553 Barbara Blackledge, MFA
Dance x2531 Linn McDonald, M.Ed.

Students are expected to check University email as well as the MTD Student Bulletin Board (SL-2nd floor near main office) regularly for important department-wide announcements and all University-related event postings (e.g., student meetings, rehearsals and performance event details, job opportunities, etc.). Music education, music therapy, and theatre students also have designated boards for posting announcements specific to those degree areas.                               

Useful Contact Information

Academic Excellence Center    
Disabilities Services LAC 223B x2335
Tutoring Program LAC 203 340-6045
Writing Center LAC 203 x2464
Bookstore NAZ 348-6248
Campus Ministry Swartz Center          961-4723
Career Services LAC 224 348-6247
Cashier's Office/Student Accounts    LAC 87 348-6212
Collegiate Volunteers Swartz Center x2419
Computer HELP DESK LRC 120 340-6070
Counseling/Student Development McGowan 1017 348-6245
Housing & Residence Life NAZ 348-6236
Learning Resouce Center/Library LRC 961-4707
Registrar's Office LAC 92 348-6280
Student Life NAZ 348-6246
University Health Services Loughran 348-6249
CAMPUS SAFETY NAZ 348-6242

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

I. Entrance Audition

            BM music education, music therapy, performance; BA arts admin/music

            Audition required. Student is not formally admitted into the department until completion of the audition and notification of acceptance into degree program.

            BA musical theatre

            Audition required in separate areas: singing, acting, and dance. Also, student meets with theatre program director for short interview.

            BA theatre, theatre education, and arts admin/theatre

            Audition required. Student performs a short, prepared monologue. Also, student meets with theatre program director for short interview.

            Transfer students

Audition required. Student may schedule an audition, but is not formally admitted into the department until the transfer application process is completed and notification of acceptance to University is received.

II. Placement Tests/Place-out Option

            A. Placement Tests

            At the audition, BM and BA degree students take placements tests in written theory, aural skills and piano proficiency to assess basic musicianship skills.

            B. Place-Out Option

            A students demonstrating outstanding skill/musicianship in a particular competency area may be eligible to place-out of a music course (e.g., written theory, aural skills). The place-out exam, administered by course instructor, is comparable to the semester final exam. Place-out exams must be completed within the first two weeks of each semester. A score of “outstanding” allows credit for the course; however, the exam grade is not computed into overall GPA. Upon receiving department notice of successful place-out, the student must then file official place-out form (see Appendix B, p. 39) with Registrar’s Office prior to the University “add/drop” deadline.

III. Pre-Requisites and Requirements

            A. Music Theory Sequence

Music and musical theatre students must complete the music theory sequence for their respective degree programs. Music majors must earn a grade of C+ or better in required theory courses (written, aural, keyboard) to gain admittance into upper level music courses for the degree program.

            B. Piano Proficiency Exam

            All BM music degree students must piano proficiency exam. Music majors take class piano (fall/spring year 1) and keyboard harmony (fall/spring year 2). Musical theatre majors take one semester of class piano (fall/year 1). Note: Non-keyboard music majors are should continue with applied lessons if deficient in keyboard skills. Music education majors must pass the proficiency exam prior to receiving department clearance for student teaching.

            C. Applied Lessons

            Arrangement for applied lessons and studio assignments are made through the MTD office. The student is responsible for contacting the applied instructor during the first week of each semester to schedule lesson time. *No lessons will be added after officially published “add/drop” period. Refer questions regarding applied lesson assignments/fees to department chair.

 Credits for applied lessons are as follows:

credits*

weekly lesson

Program Requirements

4

2-hr lesson/wk

Music performance

2

1-hr lesson/wk

Music education; Music therapy

1

½-hr lesson/wk

Music (musical theatre);

18-credit music minor

            *Course numbers are listed in four levels (100-, 200-, 300-, 400-level), and each level corresponds to the student’s year of study on that specific instrument (ex.: third-year student taking applied violin lessons for first time will register for MUSC 100-level.

            D. Practice Requirements

            Music degree students are expected to evidence progress on the applied major instrument according to performance standards set by the degree program and applied studio teacher. Practice time is defined as a minimum of one hour per day per credit. Applied teachers may institute follow-up procedures according to individual applied studio syllabus to ensure practice requirements are met.  

            E. Juries

            All MTD students must take a required applied performance exam (called “jury”) at the end of each fall and spring semester. Students are scheduled for the jury under advisement of the applied studio teacher. Unexcused absences from performance jury will result in grade “F” for the jury and will affect final grade for the applied major. Excused absences from jury must be made up by the first week of the following semester.

BM music degree students must pass the applied performance jury each semester. Sign-up sheets for juries are posted on applied faculty office doors at least one week in advance of jury day. Students are expected to demonstrate mastery of repertoire learned within each academic year, thus the jury repertoire should reflect progress from fall to spring semester. During the jury, faculty provides immediate feedback to the student via oral and written comments. Written evaluations are returned to the applied teacher and kept in the student’s file located in MTD office.

The jury is crucial in determining a student’s expected level of progress and achievement for the degree program. Scholarship renewal status is also determined at this time.

BA musical theatre students are evaluated in three areas: vocal, dance, and acting. Students are scheduled for the jury in consultation with the program director, and perform before a panel of faculty represented by each area of study.

BA theatre students must check with program director regarding the specific jury evaluation process.

            F. Performance Requirements

            Music majors (part-time and full-time status) must perform in one (1) general recital each year. Any exception to policy will be at the discretion of the applied studio instructor. Performance majors should perform in a general recital each semester.

            Musical theatre majors are required to audition for all musical theatre productions, and should accept responsibility (performance or technical role) on each theatre production mounted on main-stage and in Black Box Theatre. Musical theatre majors should participate in all master classes presented by guest artists.

            Theatre majors are required to participate (performance or technical role) on each theatre production mounted on main stage and in Black Box Theatre.

            G. Wednesdays-at-Three”

MTD music students also have an opportunity to perform publicly at least once each semester during the informal “Wednesdays-at-Three” music series held on designated Wednesdays (3:00–4:00 pm) throughout fall/spring semesters in SLC Room 104. Students should consult with the applied instructor/program director to prepare for public performances. Appropriate attire is expected for participants.

            H. “Fridays-at-Two”

            MTD theatre students are invited to perform in the “Fridays-at-Two” series on designated Fridays (2:00–3:00 pm) throughout fall/spring semesters in the Black Box Theatre. Script readings, monologues, and sharing of professional experience and training techniques are some activities appropriate for this series. Students should contact the Marywood Players to request scheduling a session.

IV. Attendance Policies

            A. Courses

            Students are expected to attend courses regularly and are held responsible for any work missed because of absence. Each instructor establishes attendance requirements for the specific course. These policies are found in the individual course syllabus. Excessive absences are reported to University Retention Office.

            B. Applied Lessons

            Students are expected to attend the weekly one-on-one applied lesson. In case of absence, the student is responsible for notifying the teacher as far in advance as possible. Missed lessons because of student absence will be made up at the discretion of the instructor. Teachers who miss regularly scheduled lessons are obligated to make up the lesson.

            C. Ensembles

            Students enrolled in department ensembles (music, theatre, or dance) are expected to attend rehearsals regularly and participate in performances as designated by the director’s course syllabus. Ensemble performances are the culminating experience for a semester’s work and are graded as such. Unexcused absences from rehearsals or performances may result in lowered grades or dismissal (with failing grade) from the ensemble at the discretion of the director.

            D. Student/Faculty Department Meetings

Attendance at meetings is mandatory. Student/Faculty department meetings are usually scheduled University-wide on the second Wednesday of each month at 3:00 – 4:00 pm. No other classes or lessons are to be scheduled during this time.

            E. Concert/Production Attendance Requirement

            Attendance at performing arts events is an essential part of educating performing artists. The MTD department maintains a Concert/Production Attendance Requirement. Students are expected to attend the various University performances (student recitals, faculty recitals, ensemble concerts, theatre productions) and regional arts organization events (i.e., professional music, theatre, and dance venues) scheduled throughout each academic year. Students should see applied studio teacher or program director regarding specific procedures for documenting attendance. Credit for attendance will only be considered in events where the student is an audience member (not a performer or part of tech crew).

V. Academic Grades/Status

            A. Grade Requirements

Students are expected to pass all required courses in the major with an earned grade of C+ (2.33) or better. Students in education degree programs (music; theatre) must attain an overall GPA of 3.0 or better for sophomore screening and maintain the 3.0 throughout the entire program of study.

            B. Tutoring

            Any student having difficulty in an academic subject should request a tutor through the Academic Excellence Center (Liberal Arts Center, Room 203). There is no charge for this tutoring service.

            C. Repeated Courses

            Any student earning a C- or lower in a required music course should retake the course in the following semester it is offered. It is not an option to “test out,” do extra credit work, or retake the final exam because of a poor/fail grade. A student may only retake a failed course twice during enrollment at Marywood. The lower grade remains on the transcript, but is not computed into overall GPA.

            D. Academic Probation

            A student earning below minimum GPA required by the University for good academic standing is placed on academic probation for the subsequent semester.  In accordance with PA state regulations for all teacher education programs, education majors earning two (2) “Unsatisfactory” grades in required field observation experience will not be allowed to remain in education degree major.

            E. Incompletes

            Students experiencing a serious situation (e.g., illness, death in family) during an academic semester may apply for an “Incomplete” in a course(s). Outside employment or heavy work schedule are not acceptable reasons for incompletes. It is the student’s responsibility to file an “Incomplete” with instructor prior to the semester’s end. University policy requires all work be completed by the published deadline (30 days into the next semester) or the “Incomplete” converts to an “F.”

            F. Leave of Absence

            According to University policy, matriculating students who will not be registered for Marywood credit during a given academic semester should apply for a leave of absence. Once a formal leave of absence has been granted, a student must either re-enroll or request an extension. Leaves are not given for more than two years. MTD students not enrolled in required music courses for more than two consecutive years must re-apply to University and may be asked to re-audition.

            G. Dismissal from University

            Any student earning an overall GPA of 2.00 or less for two consecutive semesters will receive official written notice fro the college dean of formal dismissal from the University.

VI. Academic Honesty

The University community functions best when its members treat one another with honesty, fairness, and trust. The entire community, students and faculty alike, recognizes the necessity and accepts the responsibility for academic honesty. Deception for individual gain is an offense against the entire community. Cheating and plagiarism are behaviors destructive to the learning process and ethical standards are expected of all students.

            A. Cheating is defined as (but not limited to): (a) having unauthorized material during an exam; (b) copying from another student/permitting copying by another student in a testing situation; (c) completing assignments for other students (e.g., exam, paper, lab or computer report); (d) submitting out-of-class work for in-class work without faculty knowledge; (e) changing grades; (f) unauthorized retention of exams; (g) unauthorized submission of the same paper in two different classes; (h) inventing data, unless a class exercise, or falsifying an account of data collection; (i) unauthorized tampering with electronic record; (j) violating privacy rights on computer software.

            B. Plagiarism is defined as offering as one’s own work the words, ideas, existing imagery, or arguments of another person without appropriate attribution by quotation, reference, or footnote. This includes information from any source, including Internet. Additional violations include the provision of material to another person with knowledge of improper use, possessing another student’s work without permission, selling/buying material for class assignments, changing another student’s assignment, forging signature on official academic documents, and altering any official student record including grades.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

I. All MTD Degree Programs

MTD majors must give a public performance –the capstone experience – in partial fulfillment of degree requirements for the specific major area of study.

Capstone experience

Degree Program

Senior Recital

BM degrees

(music education, music therapy, music performance)

Senior Production

 

BA degrees

(theatre, theatre education, musical theatre)

Internship (3-credit internship, 45 hrs per credit, completed in an area arts agency)

BA arts admin/primary concentration: music

Public presentation (of a hypothetical or actual theatre project proposal)

BA arts admin/primary concentration: theatre

                A. Reserving Recital/Production Venues

Recital/production venues, dates, and times must be arranged throughout the MTD office. Students must file all reservation requests early so venue is secured for the desired date. Late requests cannot be guaranteed. Required degree recitals or productions must be given on campus or in a venue approved by MTD department chair. Campus venues include: SLC Theatre; Marian Chapel; SLC Room 104; and Black Box Theatre. The MTD department web master submits event information to the University’s calendar of events office.

                B. Maintenance Requests

      Maintenance requires two (2) weeks notice for all physical space work requests, including set-up and tear down. Students should contact MTD office to file work orders. Late work requests cannot be guaranteed.

II. Music Degree Recitals

                A. Recital Parameters

                Performance majors: solo recital one-hour length in both junior and senior years 

            Music education and music therapy majors: shared recital ½-hour length

            A student who consistently evidences exceptional level of applied performance throughout the degree program may be permitted to give a solo recital upon recommendation of applied instructor and faculty recital jury.

            Non-music majors: may be permitted to give a recital of ½-hour length

            B. Concert Attire

            Appropriate, professional concert attire is required for all participants in a jury, recital, or stage production (i.e., solo performers, ensemble members, page turner, ushers, stage crew). Students must adhere to concert attire guidelines for all University-related performances on- and off-campus. No exceptions to policy. N.B. University performing ensembles have specific concert attire policies for members. Students should check with ensemble director or applied instructor.

            C. Recital Jury (required for all music majors)

            A preliminary, juried review of recital repertoire (recital jury) is held at least four (4) weeks prior to recital date. The formal jury committee, comprised of the applied teacher and two other music faculty members, determines a student’s readiness for the recital. The entire recital program must be performed at this time, including ensemble pieces. Where memorization is appropriate to the instrument, all recital works should be performed from memory. The student is responsible for securing faculty jurors at least two (2) weeks before jury. The jury committee may delay the student recital if the performance at jury is determined inadequate. In such cases, the student must repeat the jury at a later date determined by the applied instructor. The student must pass the jury to be cleared for the degree recital.

            D. Recital Accompanists

            Piano majors/keyboard students are strongly encouraged to accompany student soloists whenever possible. The student soloist is responsible for securing and paying the recital accompanist. All music scores should be submitted to the recital accompanist far in advance (at least 4 weeks) of recital date to allow sufficient opportunity for learning the scores and rehearsing with soloist.

            E. Recital Program Protocol

            The printed program must be in the approved MTD recital template (see Appendix E, p. 43). The student submits the draft recital copy to applied teacher and then to department chair for approval before final printing. Deadline for final program submission for print is no later than two (2) weeks prior to the recital date. MTD department will not print any program submitted past the deadline.

III. Theatre Degree Senior Projects (Productions)

Senior Projects are supervised in the context of the course THEA 451 Capstone Projects. (See theatre program director for specific capstone guidelines). General information is provided below:

            A. Theatre and Theatre Education

            Theatre and theatre education majors produce and direct a published non-musical play in the Black Box theatre (run time: 20-45 minutes length). The capstone project demonstrates student proficiency in all aspects of a theatre production. Students do not perform in their own capstone project.

            B. Musical Theatre

Musical theatre majors perform a half-hour solo performance to demonstrate proficiency in voice, dance, and acting. The student is expected to conceptualize the music selections around a cohesive theme or idea, may use a minimum of production elements, and minimal number of students in the performance.

            C. Arts Administration/Primary Concentration in Theatre

            Arts administration/theatre majors develop a hypothetical or actual theatre project (e.g., proposal for summer theatre program, creation of children’s theatre company, a division of existing theatre company, etc.) and formally present the proposal in a public forum. The student must demonstrate proficiency in aspects of marketing, budgeting, facility planning, fundraising, and public speaking.

            D. Capstone Program/Playbill Protocol

            The printed playbill must be in the approved MTD program template (see theatre program director for instructions). The student submits a draft playbill to program director and to department chair for approval before printing. Deadline for final submission for print is no later than two (2) weeks prior to the production date. MTD department will not print any program submitted past the deadline.

IV. Additional Information Specific to Degree

            A. Student teaching: Music education, Theatre education

Students must complete all required coursework in the music or theatre education sequence (including piano proficiency exam, if applicable) prior to receiving clearance for student teaching. Music education majors may not give the senior recital during student teaching semester. Theatre education majors may not give the senior capstone during student teaching semester. Upon completion of academic course work and student teaching, education majors may graduate but must successfully pass Pennsylvania state teacher exams to obtain certification.

             B. Internship: Music therapy

 Upon successful completion of academic and clinical components, candidates are   eligible to take the National Board Certification Exam for Music Therapists (CBMT). The credential awarded is Music Therapist-Board Certified (MT-BC).

ACADEMIC ADVISING/COUNSELING

All University students are assigned an academic advisor in the first year of study. The advisor assists with planning procedures for the student’s major program of study throughout the student’s enrollment at Marywood.

I. Advisement Process

            A. Undergraduate Catalog as Contract

            Most students follow the MU catalogue from the year in which they were accepted and admitted to the degree program. Students should be familiar with all requirements and the sequence of courses for the degree program.

            B. Academic Advisor

            Each semester, students are responsible for scheduling a meeting with academic advisors to obtain approval for and signature/release for online registration. Only the advisor of record can sign the registration form or execute an online release. While the student is responsible for meeting all degree requirements, Marywood is committed to helping students become active in this decision-making process.

             C. Accommodations for Students with Documented Disabilities

            Marywood University complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 as amended by the ADA Amendments Act of 2008. Students with disabilities who need special accommodations must submit documentation of the disability to the Office of Student Support Services, Liberal Arts Center 223B, in order for reasonable accommodations to be granted. The Office of Student Support Services will partner with students to determine the appropriate accommodations and, in cooperation with the instructor, will work to ensure that all students have a fair opportunity to perform in this class.

            Students are encouraged to notify instructors and the Office of Student Support Services as soon as they determine accommodations are necessary; however, documentation will be reviewed at any point in the semester upon receipt. Specific details of the disability will remain confidential between the student and the Office of Student Support services unless the student chooses to disclose or there is legitimate academic need for disclosure on a case-by-case basis. For assistance, please contact Director of Student Support Services.

II. Additional Advisement: Music education/Theatre education

            A. Field Office Contact

            Education majors must meet with the Director of Field Experience and attend all scheduled meetings for general education requirements, including clearances, teacher certification exams, and field placement requests. The student is responsible for filing all paperwork on time. Failure to adhere to education department requirements and/or deadlines may result in cancellation of field placements for observation or for student teaching.

            B. Sophomore Screening Process

            The sophomore screening process is the “gate” experience for entry into upper division education block courses for all majors. Students should refer to specific procedures as outlined by the University education department and found in the Sophomore Screening Packet. Each semester, the education department and field office director provide students with information related to sophomore screening and field placement via mandatory student meetings and written email communications. Students are responsible for adhering to all policies and deadlines.

III. Co-Curricular Transcripts

The Office of Student Activities maintains a transcript of co-curricular activities for each student. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the student activities office personnel to set up the initial file and also to provide periodic updates to that office. Students should keep a file of professional involvement throughout their time at Marywood. Specific information on performance or production programs, solo and group/ensemble work both on and off-campus, and any service rendered to the University or local community should be documented (see Appendix C, pp. 40-41). Membership in clubs and elected offices should also be included. This file may be submitted when applying for university or department honors.

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULAR GUIDES

The University catalog (available online) outlines course requirements for each degree program. Students must regularly check with the academic advisor to ensure compliance with degree requirements and regulations. 

I. Liberal Arts Core Curriculum

  A. OLD CORE CURRICULUM TEMPLATE (prior to 2010)

Requirements

UNIV 100 New Student Seminar (2)

The Human Condition in its Ultimate Relationship

R ST 112 Modern Belief (3) and R ST varies Elective upper-level (3)

PHIL 113 Intro to Philosophy (3) and  PHIL varies Elective upper-level (3) 

The Human Condition in the Context of the Physical World

MATH (3) and Science (3)

Plus, additional course in either Math or Science (3). Music therapy majors take BIOL 130; MATH 372, 373; and Education majors take six (6) credits math.

The Human Condition in Relation to Self and Social Structure

PSY 211 General Psych (3); HIST 105 Ethnicity/Diversity (3)

Choice: SSCI 201 Intro to Social Science (3) OR SOC 211 Intro to Sociology 

The Human Condition in its Cultural Context

ENGL 180 Intro to World Lit (3); ENGL varies elective upper-level (3)

Foreign Language varies (6)            

General Competencies

COMM 101 Dynamics of Speech (2); ENGL 160 Writing Skills (3); PED 125 Rhythms (for music majors) (2)*

*Music education majors may choose to fulfill PED 125 via DANC class

  B. NEW CORE CURRICULUM TEMPLATE (43-46 credits)

(as of fall semester 2010)

First Year Experience-4 credits

 ___ UNIV 100 (1) and ___ ENGL 160 (3)

The Human Condition in its Ultimate Relationship-12 credits

___ R ST 112 (3) and ___ R ST upper level (3)

___ PHIL 113 (3) and  ___ PHIL upper level (3)                                                      

The Human Condition in the Context of the Physical World-6 credits

___ Math (3)    

___ Math (3)* all education majors take an additional 6 credits math required for PA certification; music therapy majors take statistics for the behavior sciences

___ Science (3) music therapy majors take BIOL 130

The Human Condition in Relation to Self and Social Structure-3 credits

___ PSYC 211 (3) education majors

___ SOC 211  (3) music therapy majors

The Human Condition in its Cultural Context-12-15 credits

___ ENGL 180 (3) and ___ ENGL upper-level (3)

___ LANG (3)*additional 3 credits foreign language may be required if student does not meet pre-requisite for foreign language study; students should consult with academic advisor.

The Human Condition in Historical Context-6 credits

___ HIST-global (3) and ___ HIST (3)

 

II. Curricular Guides for MTD degrees/programs

A. Bachelor of Music (BM) degree

1. Bachelor of Music (Music Education K-12) – Required Courses

Formal application to the Teacher Education Program is made in Year 2 (sophomore screening). Screening packets are available from the Field Experience Office. PDE requires minimum 3.00 GPA for acceptance to education program. 

YEAR 1                                                           YEAR 2

MUSC 111A,B

Written Theory I

4

MUSC 211A,B

Written Theory II

2

MUSC 112A,B

Aural Skills I

2

MUSC 212A,B

Aural Skills II

2

MUSC 120A,B

Fund. Vocal Tech

2

MUSC 213A,B

Keyboard Harmony

2

MUSC 118

Percussion Methods

2

MUSC 115A,B

Conducting I

2

MUSC 127A,B

Class Piano

4

MUSC 215A

MUSC 215B

Violin Methods

Cello/Bass Methods

2

2

MUSC 1xx

Ensemble

1

MUSC 315D

MUSC 315E

High Brass

Low Brass

1

1

MUSC 1xx

App. Major

4

MUSC 2xx

App. Major

4

EDUC 100,101

Intro to Educ

1

MUSC varies

Ensemble

1

EDUC 000

Field Exper

0

EDUC 000

Field Exper

0

UNIV 100

New Student Seminar

2

HIST 105

Ethnicity & Diversity

3

R ST 112

PSYC 211

Religion

Gen Psych

3

3

SPED

PSY 251

varies

Dev Psych

3

3

ENGL 160

MATH varies

Writing Skills

Math

3

3

ENGL 180

MATH varies

Intro to World Lit

Math

3

3

YEAR 3                                                           YEAR 4

MUSC 309

Form & Analysis

3

MUSC 421

Intro to World Music

1

MUSC 303A,B

MUSC 315C

Woodwinds I, II

Instrumental Lab

2

1

Liberal Arts

varies**

6

 

MUSC 311B

Music in Elem Sch

2

 

 

 

MUSC 312

Music in Sec Sch

2

 

 

 

MUSC 322,323

History of Music I, II

6

 

 

 

MUSC 3xx

App. Major

4

MUSC 4xx

App. Major

4

MUSC 3xx

Ensemble

1

MUSC 4xx

Ensemble

1

MUSC 318ab

Vocal Diction

2

MUSC 318c

Vocal Diction

1

MUSC 412

Orchestration

2

MUSC varies

Senior Recital

0

MUSC 419

Conducting II

1

EDUC 411A

Effective Instruction

3

EDUC 000

EDUC 311

EDUC 414

Field Exper

Ed Psych

Social Foundations

0

3

3

EDUC 000

EDUC 442M

Field Exper

Student Teaching

0

9*

Liberal Arts

varies**

3

MUSC 482

Senior Recital

0

PA state teacher education regulations requires all education majors to take courses in Special Education and in ESL. To fulfill this requirement, Marywood students take: SPED 100; SPED 367, and EDUC 461. *During the semester of student teaching, students must take SPED 300. It is important that students adhere closely to these requirements so as not to delay or jeopardize student teaching.

2. Bachelor of Music (Music Therapy) – Required Courses

YEAR 1                                                           YEAR 2

MUSC 111A,B

Written Theory I

4

MUSC 211A,B

Written Theory II

2

MUSC 112A,B

Aural Skills I

2

MUSC 212A,B

Aural Skills II

2

MUSC 120A,B

Fund. Vocal Tech

2

MUSC 213A,B

Keyboard Harmony

2

MUSC 118C

Percussion Class

2

MUSC 115A,B

Conducting I

2

MUSC 127A,B

Class Piano

4

M TH 271

Pre-Intern Clinical Exp

(40 hrs)

0

MUSC 1xx

Ensemble

1

M TH 271S

Pre-Intern Seminar

1

MUSC 1xx

App. Major

4

MUSC 2xx

App. Major

4

M TH 170

Intro to Mus Therapy

4

MUSC 2xx

Ensemble

1

M TH 171

Clinical Exp (20 hrs)

0

MUSC 376

Recreational Music

2

BIOL

Anatomy/Phys-Lab

4

HIST 105

Ethnicity & Diversity

3

PSYC 211

Gen Psych

3

 

MATH 216

Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

3

 

SPED 152

Orientation to Exceptionalities

2

 

Liberal Arts

Varies*

 

 

YEAR 3                                                           YEAR 4

MUSC 322,323

History of Music I, II

6

PSYC 431

Abnormal Psych

3

MUSC 412

Orchestration

2

PSYC 432

Abnormal Behavior in Children/Adolescents

3

 

M TH 371A,B

Pre-Intern Clinical Exp (50 hrs)

0

M TH 471A,B

Pre-Intern Clinical Exp (50 hrs)

0

M TH 371S

Pre-Intern Seminar

1

M TH 471S

Pre-Intern Seminar

1

M TH 372,373

Psych Foundations

4

M TH 474

Music in Therapy

3

M TH 377

Improvisation

2

 

M TH 475

Influence of Music on Behavior

3

MUSC 3xx

Applied Major

4

MUSC 4xx

Applied Major

4

MUSC 3xx

Ensemble

1

MUSC 4xx

Ensemble

1

MUSC 318ab

Vocal Diction

2

MUSC 318c

Vocal Diction

1

SOC 211

Intro to Sociology

3

MUSC 482

Senior Recital

0

PSYC 251

Dev Psych

3

M TH 480*

Internship (1040 hrs)

0

*At the beginning of semester nearest to completion of six (6) months internship, student will register for M TH 480(01): Music Therapy Internship (National Roster) OR M TH 480(02): (Marywood-sponsored internship). Minimum 1200 hours required in pre-internship and internship combined. 

Degree—Equivalency in Music Therapy Certificate Program

The Equivalency program is regarded as entry level, and student earns undergraduate credit for courses. The degree-equivalency is for students who already hold bachelor’s degree in music and wish to obtain board certification as a music therapist. The program requires minimum of three semesters, plus minimum 1200 internship hours as specified above. Equivalency program consists of all core music therapy and clinical training requirements, plus pertinent courses in related fields (e.g., abnormal psychology).

3. Bachelor of Music (Music Performance) – Required Courses

In addition to solo recital in Year 4, performance majors must also present solo recital in Year 3.

YEAR 1                                                           YEAR 2

MUSC 111A,B

Written Theory I

4

MUSC 211A,B

Written Theory II

2

MUSC 112A,B

Aural Skills I

2

MUSC 212A,B

Aural Skills II

2

MUSC 120A,B

Fund. Vocal Tech

2

MUSC 213A,B

Keyboard Harmony

2

MUSC 1xx

App. Major

8

MUSC 115A,B

Conducting I

2

MUSC 127A,B

Class Piano or

App. Minor

4

 

MUSC varies

Pedagogy/Literature

1-4

MUSC varies

Ensemble

1

MUSC 2xx

App. Major

8

 

 

 

MUSC varies

Ensemble

1

YEAR 3                                                           YEAR 4

MUSC 318abc

Vocal Lit*

2

MUSC 318abc

Vocal Lit*

1

MUSC 322,323

History of Music I, II

6

MUSC 415

Composition

3

MUSC 3xx

App. Major

8

MUSC 4xx

App. Major

8

MUSC 309

Form & Analysis

3

MUSC 421

Intro to World Music

3

MUSC 412

Orchestration

2

MUSC varies

Music Elective

3

MUSC 411

MUSC 3xx

Modal Counterpoint

App Major Literature

3

3

MUSC 413

MUSC 4xx

Tonal Counterpoint

App Major Pedagogy

3

1-3

MUSC 419

Conducting II

1

MUSC 4xx

Ensemble

1

MUSC 3xx

Ensemble

1

 

 

 

MUSC 382

Junior Recital

0

MUSC 482

Senior Recital

0

*voice majors

Students also follow all requirements of the  University’s Liberal Arts Core Curriculum for all general education classes.

 

B. Bachelor of Arts (BA) Degree Programs

1. Bachelor of Arts - Music (Musical Theatre) – Required Courses

MUSIC COMPONENT                                  THEATRE COMPONENT                 

MUSC 111A,B

Written Theory I

4

THEA 113

Intro to Theatre

3

MUSC 112A,B

Aural Skills I

2

THEA 230B

Theatre Lab

1

MUSC 115A

Conducting I

1

THEA 241

Fund. of Acting

3

MUSC 120A,B

Fund. Vocal Tech

2

THEA 242

Advanced Acting

3

MUSC 127A

Class Piano

2

THEA 244abcd

Audition Workshop

2

MUSC 319A,B

Musical Theatre Rep

3

THEA 247A

Stage Management

2

MUSC 322,323

History of Music I, II

6

THEA 330B

Theatre Lab

1

MUSC varies

Applied Major

7

THEA 341

Theatre History

2

MUSC varies

Vocal Ensemble

2

THEA 342A

THEA 342B

Tragedy in Drama Lit

Comedy in Drama Lit

2

2

MUSC varies

Elective

2

THEA 347

Fund. of Directing

3

 

 

 

THEA 404

Theatre as Business

2

 

 

 

THEA 451

 

Capstone Project

3

 

DANCE COMPONENT*                                                      

DANC 140

Fundamentals of Dance/Movement     

3

DANC 141

Body Awareness

3

DANC 142

Fundamentals of Improv/Choreography

3

DANC 144

Dance Technique:

(includes: Ballet, jazz, modern, tap, musical theatre, ballroom dancing, stage combat, and special topics)

6

DANC xxx

Dance Company

2

 

 

 

 

2. Bachelor of Arts (Theatre) – Required Courses

(careers in performance, production, and management positions)

Basic requirements for all students in Theatre program (15 credits):

THEA 113

Intro to Theatre

3

THEA 130A

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 247A

Stage Management

2

THEA 341

Theatre History

2

THEA 342A

Tragedy in Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 342B

Comedy in Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 451

Capstone Project

3

BA in THEATRE (65 credits)

Course requirements include the 15 credits listed above plus: 

THEA 241

Fundamentals of Acting

3

THEA 247B

Scenic Design

2

THEA 247C

Lighting and Sound Design

2

THEA 247D

Costuming and Make-Up

2

THEA 343

Theatre Management

2

THEA 347

Fundamentals of Directing

3

THEA 404

Theatre as Business

2

THEA 130B

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 230A,B

Theatre Lab

1,1

THEA 330A,B

Theatre Lab

1,1

THEA 430A,B

Theatre Lab

1,1

PLUS: 6 credits from the following:

THEA 242

Advanced Acting

3

THEA 247

Advanced Production

3

THEA 348

Advanced Directing

3

DANC 140

Fundamentals of Dance/Movement

3

* Students select electives with advisement and are encouraged to take 18-credit minor in an area of related interest.

 

3. Bachelor of Arts (Comm Arts/Theatre Education 7-12) - Required Courses

(7-12 teacher certification – English, theatre, and non-print media)

 Basic requirements for all students in Theatre Education program (15 credits):

THEA 113

Intro to Theatre

3

THEA 247A

Stage Management

2

THEA 341

Theatre History

2

THEA 342A

Tragedy in Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 342B

Comedy in Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 451

Capstone Project

3

THEA 130A

Theatre Lab

1

BA in Theatre Education (74 credits)

Course requirements include the 15 credits listed above plus:

COMM 112

Communication Theory

3

THEA 230A or B

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 330A or B

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 430A or B

Theatre Lab

1

ENGL 400

Structure of Linguistics

3

THEA 241

Fundamentals of Acting

3

THEA 247B

Scenic Design

2

THEA 247C

Lighting and Sound Design

2

THEA 347

Fundamentals of Directing

3

 PLUS: 6 credits from the following:

COMM 231

Audio Production

3

COMM 233

Video Production I

3

COMM 234

Video Production II

3

COMM 237

New Communication Tech

3

COMM xxx

Non-print media course (selected with advisement)

3

 Professional education sequence includes the following courses:

EDUC 000

Field Experience (ongoing)

0

EDUC 100, 101

Intro to Education

.5, .5

PSY 251

Developmental Psychology

3

PSY 311

Educational Psychology

3

EDUC 411A

Effective Instruction

3

EDUC 442

SPED

Student Teaching

Curriculum Adaptations

9

3

SPED 100, 367, EDUC 461

Sp Ed required courses

9

*ENGL 412A OR

ENGL 412B

Teaching of Writing OR                     Teaching of Literature

3

*one of these courses is applied to the requirements for the major and one may be applied as either an upper-level liberal arts English Requirement OR liberal arts General Elective. 

4. Bachelor of Arts (Arts Administration) – Required Courses

Combining music, art or theatre and a business component, the arts administration program enables students to develop: (a) competencies in music; (b) skills in business administration; and, (c) familiarity with separate and combined standards for effective arts management. Students choosing Art as primary concentration should refer to Art department for art course requirements. Students choosing Music as primary concentration are required to audition.

BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS (all students)

BUS 103

Computer Tools for Management

3

BUS 111

Principles of Marketing

3

BUS 121

Principles of Management

3

BUS 131

Accounting I

3

BUS 132

Accounting II

3

BUS 252

Business Law

3

BUS varies

Electives

6

CONCENTRATIONS IN (a):

Music Primary                                                          Music Secondary

MUSC 111A

Written Theory I

2

MUSC 111A

Written Theory I

2

MUSC 112A

Aural Skills I

1

MUSC 112A

Aural Skills

1

MUSC 115A

Conducting I

1

MUSC 115A

Conducting I

1

MUSC 120A

Fund. Vocal Tech

1

MUSC 120A

Fund. Vocal Tech

1

MUSC 322,323

History of Music I, II

6

MUSC 322,323

History of Music I, II

6

MUSC varies

Applied Music

4

MUSC varies

Applied Music

2

MUSC varies

Ensemble

3

MUSC varies

Ensemble

2

MUSC 203

Arts Management

3

 

MUSC 303

Practicum

2

 

MUSC 403

Internship

3

 

 CONCENTRATIONS IN (b):

Theatre Primary                                           Theatre Secondary

THEA 113

Intro to Theatre

3

 

 

 

THEA 130B

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 230AorB

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 247A

Stage Management

2

THEA 247A

Stage Management

2

THEA 330B

Theatre Lab

1

 

 

 

THEA 341

Theatre History

2

THEA 341

Theatre History

2

THEA 342A

Tragedy Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 342A

Tragedy Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 342B

Comedy Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 342B

Comedy Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 343

Theatre Management

2

THEA 343

Theatre Management

2

THEA 404

Theatre as a Business

3

 

THEA 430B

Theatre Lab

1

 

THEA 450

Internship

3

 

THEA 451

Capstone Project

3

 

PLUS: (primary and secondary concentrations choose two courses from the following three:

THEA 247B

Scenic Design

2

THEA 247C

Lighting/Sound Design

2

THEA 247D

Costuming/Make-Up

2

C. Opportunities for Non-MTD Majors

Students from across all University departments and disciplines have the opportunity to continue studies in music, theatre, and/or dance as part of electives within their individual degree program:

1. Minor Specializations

a) MINOR IN MUSIC (18 credits)

MUSC 111A

Written Theory

2

MUSC 112A

Aural Skills

1

MUSC 115A, B

Conducting I

2

MUSC 120A, B

Fund. Vocal Tech

2

MUSC 322, 323

History of Music I or II

3

MUSC varies

Applied Music

4

MUSC varies

Electives (2 electives should be in ensemble)

4

b) MINOR IN THEATRE (18 credits)

THEA 230A or B

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 247A

Stage Management

2

THEA 330A or B

Theatre Lab

1

THEA 341

Theatre History

2

THEA 342A

Tragedy in Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 342B

Comedy in Dramatic Lit

2

THEA 347

Fundamentals of Directing

3

THEA 430A or B

Theatre Lab

1

PLUS: choose two (2) from the following three courses below:

THEA 247B

Scenic Design

2

THEA 247C

Lighting/Sound Design

2

THEA 247D

Costuming/Make-Up

2

 c) MINOR IN DANCE (18 credits)

DANC 140

Fundamentals of Dance/Movement

3

DANC 141

Body Awareness

3

DANC 142

Fundamentals of Improv/Choreog

3

DANC 143A or B

Dance Ensemble

3

DANC varies

Dance Tech

6 (ballet; jazz; modern dance; tap; musical theatre; stage combat)

*Some majors (e.g., psychology, early childhood, special ed) require course substitution of Body Awareness with Kinesiology, which has prerequisite of two science courses applied to liberal arts requirements.

2. Undeclared Major (with interest in music)

Students undecided about a major field of study or who do not meet admission standards of the desired major at the time of admission are categorized as Undeclared. Undeclared status may be given as a result of combined SAT math/reading score of less than 970 for an incoming undergraduate seeking the music education degree, or a transfer student entering with GPA less than the 3.0 requirement. Undeclared status is not a major, and students cannot receive a degree in this category. Students are encouraged to declare a major early in the university experience. First year students should declare a major by the completion of 32 credits or the end of first year. Transfer students should declare a major by the completion of 16 Marywood credits.

 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION

I. Performing Ensembles

The Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance offers the following ensembles:

            A. Music

            Campus Choir; Chamber Singers; Women’s Chorale

            Wind Ensemble; Orchestra; Jazz Ensemble; Brass Ensemble

            Chamber Ensembles (strings, percussion, wind, trumpet, guitar)

            B. Theatre

            Theatre Ensemble for main-stage and student-directed production consists of all theatre degree students as well as non-majors wishing to be involved in public performance. There are three main-stage productions each year, one of which is Children’s Theatre.

            C. Dance

            Dance Elan is the University’s pre-professional dance company. Students may also participate in the MU Apprentice Company and the Dance Minors Ensemble. Auditions are held at the beginning of each semester, and students are selected for the various company ensembles according to performance skills in ballet, tap, jazz, and modern dance. Dance students perform in a showcase production each semester, as well as collaborative opportunities with other music ensembles.

            D. Ensemble Credit Requirements

            Students in BM degree programs complete 4 credits (8 semesters) participation in the appropriate large ensemble before graduation. Students in BA degree program in music (musical theatre) must complete 2 credits (4 semesters) of ensemble.

 

 II. Storage Spaces

            A. Personal Items/equipment

            Student personal items should not be stored in practice rooms, offices, or classrooms. The University building is a shared, public space. Every effort should be made to maintain order and cleanliness. All equipment (including music scores0 should be returned to the appropriate storage space immediately after use. 


            B. Instrument Lockers

            Individual instrument lockers for music students are located along the PAC 1st floor hallway corridor. Locker assignments will be secured within the first two weeks of the fall semester, and are made on a first come/first served basis. All locker requests or questions should be made in person at the main MTD office. Misuse of locker storage space will result in loss of locker use privileges.

III. Practice Spaces

            A. Practice Rooms, Classrooms

            Only registered Marywood students, faculty, or staff may use practice rooms. Music majors have first priority for practice rooms. Students reserve a room and practice times each semester by signing the schedule posted on each room’s door. N.B. Only those authorized to teach applied lessons through the University may use Marywood facilities for teaching purposes.

            It is important that all students take responsibility for the cleanliness and security of the practice spaces. Chairs, benches, or music stands are not to be removed from the practice room. Practice rooms should be left in good order for the next occupant (close windows, turn off lights, remove any trash, etc.). No food or drink is allowed in the practice rooms, except for water in closed or bottled container.

            B. Large-Ensemble Areas (Room 104, Main Theatre, Black Box Theatre)

            Several large rehearsal spaces within the building function as both academic classroom and rehearsal space for various MTD programs (Main Theatre, SL Room 104, Black Box). All spaces should be left clean and ready for the next event or class. This includes piano covered or put away, chairs returned to rows or stacked, lights out, and windows closed.

IV. Computer Labs

Only registered Marywood students, faculty, or staff may use University computers. Any student found using computers for non-academic purposes (e.g., playing video games, internet chat, videos, etc.) will be immediately removed from the computer lab room. Failure to comply with University Computer Use policy will result in loss of access to lab facilities (see University Catalog and MTD Handbook Appendix D, 4. 42).

            A. Computer Lab/Classroom (1st floor)

12 MAC computers. Accommodates word processing, desktop publishing, computer graphics, scriptwriting, set and lighting design, and multimedia productions. Internet access available.

            B. Electronic Music Lab (2nd floor)

            4 MAC and 4 PC computers. Accommodates word processing, Sibelius music-writing software, 8 mini-electronic MIDI keyboards & headphones; two electronic keyboards; and mixers. Internet access available.

 

V. MTD Student Ambassadors 

As a member of the MTD performing arts community, students are encouraged to participate in departmental service activities throughout the fall and spring semester. Activities include: ushering, audition day Ambassadors, Open House/Orientation student representative. Students are expected to demonstrate a positive attitude and exemplary behavior as ambassadors of the Department.

VI. Honor Societies/Collegiate Clubs

            A. Pi Kappa Lambda – National Music Honor Society

            Consideration for membership is based upon the following criteria:

            Undergraduate seniors must be in the upper 1/5 of their class

            Juniors must be in the upper 1/10 of their class

            Graduate students must have earned grade of A in 2/3 of graduate studies

            Faculty members are elected to membership according to PKL National  Constitution regulations.           

            B. National Association of Music Education (NAfME-Collegiate)

            NAfME is the organization that serves as leader and spokesperson for music education in the US. NAfME student chapters provide opportunities for professional development for collegiate music education majors through on-campus workshops, participation in state, division, and national meetings. NAfME membership also includes Pennsylvania state affiliation (PMEA). 

            C. American Music Therapy Association (AMTA-Collegiate)

            The Music Therapy Club is the collegiate arm of the national music therapy association, providing majors with professional development and leadership opportunities via on-campus workshops, participation in regional and national student meetings, and sharing of talent and resources through volunteer services in the local community.

            D. The Marywood Players

            The Players provide formidable support for the academic theatre program as well as provide for the personal and professional enrichment of the membership by such activities as fundraising for charity, sponsoring field trips to professional performances, sponsoring workshops, conducting forums for sharing professional experiences and training techniques.

HEALTH & SAFETY INFORMATION FOR STUDENT MUSICIANS

Introduction

The Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance, as required by the National Association of Schools of Music, is obligated to inform students and faculty of health and safety issues, hazards, and procedures inherent in practice, performance, teaching, and listening both in general and as applicable to their specific specializations. This includes but is not limited to information regarding hearing, vocal and musculoskeletal health, injury prevention, and the use, proper handling, and operation of potentially dangerous materials, equipment, and technology.

MTD department has developed policies, protocols, and operational procedures to guard against injury and illness in the study and practice of music, as well as to raise the awareness among our students and faculty of the connections between musicians’ health, the suitability and safety of equipment and technology, and the acoustic and other health-related conditions in the University’s practice, rehearsal, and performance facilities.

It is important to note that health and safety depends largely on personal decisions made by informed individuals. Marywood University has health and safety responsibilities, but fulfillment of these responsibilities cannot and will not ensure any individual’s health and safety. Too many factors beyond the university’s control are involved.

Each individual is personally responsible for avoiding risk and preventing injuries to themselves before, during, and after study or employment in the Department of Music, Theatre, & Dance.

Performance injuries

Performing artists have the potential to suffer injuries that are directly related to the practice, rehearsal, or performance of music. Instrumentalists are at risk for physical problems related to playing their instruments. Repetitive motion injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, and bursitis, incorrect posture, non-ergonomic technique, excessive force, overuse, stress, and insufficient rest contribute to chronic injuries that can cause debilitating pain and the end of a performing career. Computer users encounter health issues related to back and neck strain problems, as well as hand-related injuries.

Advice for instrumentalists

The Department of MTD wishes to thank the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music and the Canadian Network for Health in the Arts for the following information:

  1. Evaluate your technique. Reduce force, keep joints in the middle of their range of motion, use large muscle groups when possible, and avoid fixed, tense positions.
  2. Always warm up. Just as an athlete warms up before a vigorous physical activity, a musician must warm up carefully before practice of performance. 
  3. Take breaks to stretch and relax. Take short breaks every few minutes and longer breaks each hour. Two or more shorter rehearsals each day are more productive than marathon single sessions.  
  4. Pace yourself. No pain, no gain is a potentially catastrophic philosophy for a musician. Know when enough is enough, and learn to say “no” to certain performances or lengths of performing that might result in injury. 
  5. Check out your instrument. Does your instrument place undue stress on your body? Is your instrument set up optimally for you to relieve pressure on hands, joints, etc.? Is there a strap, carrier, or stand available to relieve the stress? 
  6. Evaluate other activities. Pains and injuries affecting your music making could be caused by other activities in your daily life. Computer use is notorious for causing afflictions including carpal tunnel syndrome and tendinitis. 
  7. Pay attention to your body. Pain is the mechanism by which your body tells you that something is wrong. Listen to your body; if it hurts, stop what you are doing. 
  8. Get medical attention. Do not delay in seeing a doctor. A physician may prescribe a minor adjustment or, in worst-case scenarios, stipulate not performing for a period of time. As drastic as this may sound, a few months of reset is better than suffering a permanent, career ending injury. Likewise, the demands placed on singers’ voices are immense. Hardly a month goes by where a top singer is not forced to interrupt a tour, take a break, or undergo a medical procedure due to problems with their voice. Medical professionals are making the case that the demands put on one’s voice when singing one to three hours is an intense as those made on an Olympic marathon runner’s body. Additional factors such as nutrition, smoking, drug use, noisy environments, and proper voice training (or the lack of it) all play a role in a singer’s ability to perform at his/her best. 

 

Advice for vocalists

The Department of MTD wishes to thank The Singer’s Resource, the Texas Voice Center, Houston, and the University of Michigan Vocal Health Center for the following information:

  1. Maintain good general health. Get adequate rest to minimize fatigue. If you do become ill, avoid “talking over your laryngitis” – see your physician and rest your voice. 
  2. Exercise regularly.
  3. Eat a balanced diet. Including vegetables, fruit and whole grains, and avoid caffeinated drinks (coffee, tea, and soft drinks) and alcohol. Avoid spicy, acidic, and dairy foods if you are sensitive to them. 
  4. Maintain body hydration. Drink two quarts of water daily. 
  5. Avoid dry, artificial interior climate. Using a humidifier at night might compensate for the dryness. 
  6. Limit the use of your voice. High ceilinged restaurants, noisy parties, cars and planes are especially damaging to the voice. If necessary, use amplification for vocal projection. 
  7. Avoid throat clearing and voiced coughing.
  8. Stop yelling and avoid hard vocal attacks on initial vowel words.
  9. Adjust the speaking pitch level of your voice. Use the pitch level in the same range where you say “Umm-hmm?” 
  10. Speak in phrases rather than in paragraphs. Breathe slightly before each phrase.  
  11. Reduce demands on your voice. Don’t do all the talking! 
  12. Learn to breathe silently to activate your breath support muscles and reduce neck tension.  
  13. Take full advantage of the two free elements of vocal fold healing: water and air.
  14. Vocal athletes must treat the musculoskeletal system as do other types of athletes; therefore, vocal warm-ups should always be used prior to singing. Vocal cool-downs are also essential to keep the singing voice healthy.  

 

Advice for all musicians

Stay informed. Awareness is the key. Like many health-related issues, prevention is much easier and less expensive than cures. Take time to read available information concerning injuries associated with your art.

The following links may be useful:

www.artsmed.org Performing Arts Medicine Association (PAMA)

www.texasvoicecenter.com Texas Voice Center

www.med.umich.edu/oto/vocalhealthcenter/ University of Michigan

www.thesingersresource.com/vocal_health.htm The Singer’s Resource

Antiseptically Clean

More and more our society is pushing for products that are anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, and anti-viral. Some even go the next step further aiming to achieve sterile. However, our bodies by design are not meant to live in a sterile environment. Keep in mind that total sterility is a fleeting moment. Once a sterile instrument has been handled or exposed to room air it is no longer considered to be sterile. It will, however, remain antiseptically clean until used.

Most viruses cannot live on hard surfaces for a prolonged period of time. Some die simply with exposure to air. However, certain groups are quite hardy. Therefore, musicians must be concerned with instrument hygiene. Users of school owned and rented musical equipment might be more susceptible to infections from instruments that are not cleaned and maintained properly.

If the cleaning process is thorough, however, musical instruments will be antiseptically clean. Just as with the utensils you eat with, soap and water can clean off anything harmful. Antibacterial soaps will kill certain germs but all soaps will carry away the germs that stick to dirt and oils while they clean. No germs/no threat.

Infectious Disease Risks

Sharing musical instrument is a widespread, accepted practice in the profession. However, recent discussion in the profession has included concern regarding shared musical instruments and infectious disease.

Instrument Hygiene

While the possibility of transmission of the above bacteria and viruses is not a real consideration, it is apparent that there should be a protocol with regard to shared musical instruments. Sharing of instruments is routine in music schools, where students practice and perform on borrowed instruments throughout the year. In our discussion with our consultants, certain basic considerations and recommendations for stand operating procedures regarding shared instruments were recommended as follows:

  1. All students should have their own instruments, if possible.
  2. All students should have their own mouthpiece, if possible.
  3. All students and faculty sharing reed instruments must have their own individual reeds. Reeds should never be shared.
  4. If instruments must be shared in class, alcohol wipes or Sterisol germicide solution (both available from the MTD course instructor) should be available for use between different people. When renting or using a department-owned musical instrument, each user must understand that regular cleaning of these musical instruments is required in order to practice proper hygiene.

 

Mouthpieces

The mouthpiece is essential part of wind instruments. As the only parts of these instruments placed either in or in close proximity to the musician’s mouth, research has concluded that these parts (and reeds) harbor the greatest quantities of bacteria. Adhering to the following procedures will ensure that these instrumental parts will remain antiseptically clean for the healthy and safe use of instruments by our students and faculty.

Cleaning Head Joint (Flute)

1. Using a cotton swab saturated with denatured, isopropyl alcohol, carefully clean around embouchure hole.
2. Alcohol wipes can be used on the flute's lip plate to kill germs if the flute shared by several players.
3. Using a soft, lint-free silk cloth inserted into the cleaning rod, clean the inside of the head joint.
4. Do not run the head joint under water as it may saturate and eventually shrink the head joint cork.

Cleaning Bocals (English Horn and Bassoon)

1. Bocals should be cleaned every month with a bocal brush, mild soap solution, and running water. English Horn bocals can be cleaned with a pipe cleaner, mild soap solution, and running water. Be careful not to scratch the inside of the bocal with the exposed wire ends of the pipe cleaner. Hard rubber ebony mouthpieces should be swabbed after each playing and cleaned weekly.
2. Select a small (to use less liquid) container that will accommodate the mouthpiece and place the mouthpiece tip down in the container.
3. Fill the container to where the ligature would begin with a solution of half water and half white vinegar (50% water and 50% hydrogen peroxide works too). Protect clarinet mouthpiece corked tenons from moisture.
4. After a short time, use an appropriately sized mouthpiece brush to remove any calcium deposits or other residue from inside and outside surfaces. This step may need to be repeated if mouthpiece is excessively dirty.
5. Rinse the mouthpiece thoroughly and then saturate with Sterisol germicide solution. Place on paper towel and wait one minute.
6. Wipe dry with paper towel.
7. Note: Metal saxophone mouthpieces clean up well with hot water, mild dish soap (not dishwasher detergent), and a mouthpiece brush. Sterisol germicide solution is also safe for metal mouthpieces.

Cleaning Saxophone Necks (Crooks)

1. Swabs and pad-savers are available to clean the inside of the saxophone neck. However, most saxophonists use a flexible bottlebrush and toothbrush to accomplish the same results.
2. If the instrument is played daily, the saxophone neck should be cleaned weekly (and swabbed out each day after playing).
3. Use the bottlebrush and mild, soapy water to clean the inside of the neck.
4. Rinse under running water.
5. Sterisol germicide solution may be used on the inside of the neck at this time, if desired (not necessary). Place on paper towel for one minute.
6. Rinse again under running water, dry, and place in the case.
7. If using pad-savers, do not leave the pad-saver inside the neck when packed away.

Cleaning Mouthpieces (Brass)

1. Mouthpieces should be cleaned monthly.
2. Using a cloth soaked in warm, soapy water, clean the outside of the mouthpiece.
3. Use a mouthpiece brush and warm, soapy water to clean the inside.
4. Rinse the mouthpiece and dry thoroughly.
5. Sterisol germicide solution may be used on the mouthpiece at this time. Place on paper towel for one minute.
6. Wipe dry with paper towel.

Other Instruments

String, percussion, and keyboard instruments present few hygienic issues that cannot be solved by a simple washing of the hands before and after use.

Hearing Safety

Information contained in this section is not a substitute for professional medical judgments. If you are concerned about your hearing or think you may have suffered hearing loss, consult a licensed medical professional.

Part of the role of any professional is to remain in the best condition to practice the profession. As an aspiring musician, this involves safeguarding your hearing health. Whatever your plans after graduation - whether they involve playing, teaching, engineering, or simply enjoying music - you owe it to yourself and your fellow musicians to do all you can to protect your hearing. If you are serious about pursuing a career in music, you need to protect your hearing. The way you hear music, the way you recognize and differentiate pitch, the way you play music; all are directly connected to your hearing.

Music & Noise

In the scientific world, all types of sound, including music, are regularly categorized as noise. A sound that it too loud, or too loud for too long, is dangerous to hearing health, no matter what kind of sound it is or whether we call it noise, music, or something else. Music itself is not the issue. Loudness and its duration are the issues. Music plays an important part in hearing health, but hearing health is far larger than music.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL)

We experience sound in our environment, such as the sounds from television and radio, household appliances, and traffic. Normally, we hear these sounds at safe levels that do not affect our hearing. However, when we are exposed to harmful noise-sounds that are too loud or loud sounds that last a long time-sensitive structures in our inner ear can be damaged, causing noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). These sensitive structures, called hair cells, are small sensory cells that convert sound energy into electrical signals that travel to the brain. Once damaged, our hair cells cannot grow back. NIHL can be caused by a one-time exposure to an intense "impulse" sound, such as an explosion, or by continuous exposure to loud sounds over an extended period of time. The humming of a refrigerator is 45 decibels, normal conversation is approximately 60 decibels, and the noise from heavy city traffic can reach 85 decibels. Sources of noise that can cause NIHL include motorcycles, firecrackers, and small firearms, all emitting sounds from 120 to 150 decibels. Long or repeated exposure to sounds at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss. The louder the sound, the shorter the time period before NIHL can occur. Sounds of less than 75 decibels, even after long exposure, are unlikely to cause hearing loss. Although being aware of decibel levels is an important factor in protecting one's hearing, distance from the source of the sound and duration of exposure to the sound are equally important. A good rule of thumb is to avoid noises that are "too loud" and "too close" or that last "too long."

It is very important to understand that the hair cells in your inner ear cannot regenerate. Damage done to them is permanent. There is no way to repair or undo this damage.

According to the American Academy of Audiology, approximately 26 million Americans have hearing loss. One in three developed their hearing loss as a result of exposure to noise. As you pursue your day-to-day activities, both in the Department of Music and in other educational, vocational, and recreational environments, remember:

1. Hearing health is essential to your lifelong success as a musician.
2. Your hearing can be permanently damaged by loud sounds, including music. Technically, this is called Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). This danger is constant.
3. Noise-induced hearing loss is generally preventable. You must avoid overexposure to loud sounds, especially for long periods of time.
4. The closer you are to the source of a loud sound, the greater the risk of damage.
5. Sounds over 85 dB (your typical vacuum cleaner) in intensity pose the greatest risk to your hearing.
6. Recommended maximum daily exposure times to sounds at or above 85 dB are as follows: 85 dB (vacuum cleaner, MP3 player at 1/3 volume) - 8 hours 90 dB (blender, hair dryer) - 2 hours 94 dB (MP3 player at 1/2 volume) - 1 hour 100 dB (MP3 player at full volume, lawnmower) - 15 minutes 110 dB (rock concert, power tools) - 2 minutes 120 dB (jet planes at take-off) - without ear protection, sound damage is almost immediate
7. Certain behaviors (controlling volume levels in practice and rehearsal, planning rehearsal order to provide relief from high volume works, avoiding noisy environments) reduce your risk of hearing loss.
8. The use of earplugs (Sensaphonics, ProGuard, Sensorcom) helps to protect your hearing health.
9. Day-to-day decisions can impact your hearing health, both now and in the future. Since sound exposure occurs in and out of the Department of Music, you also need to learn more and take care of your own hearing health on a daily, even hourly basis.
10. If you are concerned about your personal hearing health, talk with a medical professional.
11. If you are concerned about your hearing health in relationship to your study of music at UNLV, consult with your applied instructor, ensemble conductor, advisor, or Department Chair.

Resources - Information and Research Hearing Health Project Partners

National Association of School of Music (NASM) http://nasm.arts-accredit.org/

Performing Arts Medicine Association (PAMA) http://www.artsmed.org/index.html

PAMA Bibliography (search tool) http://www.artsmed.org/bibliography.html

 

 

 

APPENDIX A

APPLICATION FOR COURSE PLACE-OUT EXAMINATION

I hereby apply for the place-out examination specified below. I understand that:

  1. The course will be recorded in my academic transcript.
  2. The course will not be computed in my GPA.
  3. I may substitute another music course for the one in which I placed-out to fulfill my degree requirements.
  4. If I do not pass the exam, I must register for and take the course during a regular university semester.

 

I understand that there is a non-refundable fee payable to the Registrar for processing the place-out document (See Registrar’s Office for fee information).

Test Requested:          ______________________________________________________

                                                                        Catalog Number/Title

________________________________________________________________________

Date                                                                Signature of Applicant

 

Approval of Department Chair

Date test is to be given:          ________________________________________________

Signature of Chair:                  ________________________________________________

Department                             ________________________________________________

 

Treasurer’s Office                                                                   Evaluator

Payment          ______________________              Date    ________________________

Date    ____________________________               Grade earned   __________________

Credit No.       ______________________               Remarks          __________________

Rec’d by         ______________________                By ___________________________

 

 

APPENDIX B

 CONCERT/PRODUCTION ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT

 

The concert/production attendance requirement offers students the opportunity to become familiar with a broad range of performance styles/genres, and begin cultivating a personal commitment to the arts as active patrons (as well as solo and ensemble performers).

All music degree students must attend a minimum of six (6) concerts per semester – three (3) performances should be off-campus venues and three (3) from University-sponsored on-campus groups (see applied studio teacher for details).

All music (musical theatre) students must attend a minimum of four (4) performance events related to music/theatre per semester – Two (2) performances should be off-campus venues and two (2) from University-sponsored on campus groups (see program director for details).

Possible events may include, but are not limited to: Regional music organizations (Northeastern Philharmonic Orchestra, Scranton Community Concert Series, Northern Tier Orchestra, Robert Dale Chorale, Lyric Consort); theatre ensemble organizations (Broadway Theatre League, NYC and/or Philadelphia theatre venues); University-sponsored, on-campus performing events (music ensembles, theatre capstones, dance showcases, general student recitals, music faculty recitals, vocal and instrumental ensembles). 

 

 

APPENDIX C

 CO-CURRICULAR TRANSCRIPT WORKSHEET

 

Name  ______________________________ Current Year_________ Class of_______

 

 I. RECORD OF PROFESSIONAL INVOLVEMENT

  1. Club or Organization Membership

Organization                Member                       Officer                         Local / State / National

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. On-campus Workshops, Meetings

Date     Title & Clinician                                  Organization                Task or Responsibility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Off-campus Workshops, Conferences, In-service

Date     Title & Clinician                                  Organization                Task or Responsibility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Participation in Recitals and/or Theatre Productions

Date     Place                                        Performing Event                    Ensemble/Solo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. Volunteer Work at Institutions, Service Organizations (not required for degree)

Date                 Place                            Type of Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III. Leadership Projects 

Year                 Brief Description of Project(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV. Employment Experience (related to degree program) 

Year                 Job Responsibility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX D

 MTD COMPUTER LAB POLICY

 NOTE: A signed copy of this agreement must be filed with the academic advisor

 

1. Food and/or drinks are not allowed in computer lab at any time.

2. University computer lab facilities are intended for academic use by Marywood

undergraduate or graduate students.

3. Computer labs are not storage spaces for personal belongings (book bags,

instruments, clothing) and such items should not be left in labs for any reason.

4. No unauthorized software or files are to be installed on University computers

without permission of the course instructor or department chair.

5. Students should make backup copies of all individual work on flash drives or in

Temporary Student File on desktop. 

6. No student may plug or unplug wires from the back of any computer hard drive

tower. Flash drive extension cords are located on every computer and should be

used accordingly.

7. Students should be mindful of others when using lab facilities; headphones are

provided at each computer station and should used for all audio work.

 

By signing my name below, I agree to follow the rules governing use of the music lab

and computer facilities. I understand that failure to comply with the University’s

published Computer Use Policy will result in losing access to computer lab facilities

 

Name (print) ____________________________________________________________ 

Student Signature ______________________________________________________

Date: _______________________________________

 

APPENDIX E

MTD PROGRAM TEMPLATE FOR PERFORMANCES

All internal and external MTD publications are required to include particular elements in programs, brochures, posters, off-campus advertisements for performing events (general recitals, degree recitals, theatre capstones). Refer to the checklist below:

 

General Elements for all MTD programs, brochures, advertisement posters:

___ Insalaco College of Creative and Performing Arts

___ Sette LaVerghetta Center for Performing Arts (or Marian Chapel)

___ Department of Music, Theatre, & Dance

___ In partial fulfillment of degree requirements for the (insert degree title here)

Additional Elements for Music Recitals and Programs:

___ List composition titles, individual movements, composer and/or arranger followed

         by birth/death dates

___ List accompanist, ensemble players, if applicable

___ Include lyric translations or program notes, if applicable

 

* Check with department chair for music program template for general recitals and degree recitals

 

Theatre Productions:

___ Front cover with General Elements for MTD department (see below)

___ Specific theatre production cover

         NOTE: This is the actual playbill cover with visual graphics specific to the

         production or play

Dance Productions:

___ Front cover with General Elements for MTD department (see below)

___ Ensemble member names

___ Choreographer name

___ List music ensemble players, if applicable

 

*Check with department chair for performance program template

 

 

APPENDIX F

MUSIC RECITAL CHECKLIST

 

The following tasks must be completed prior to the recital-semester (e.g., for spring semester recital, tasks must be completed in fall semester):

 

___   Select recital date

___   Check venue availability with MTD office and formally reserve recital space

___   Secure accompanist (and any ensemble players, if needed) for the recital date

___   Contact University recording engineer to arrange sound recording, if desired

___   Time all pieces prior to final programming decisions to ensure compliance with recital length (either 30- or 60-minutes length according to degree)

 

Tasks below are completed within the actual recital-semester:

___   Schedule the recital jury at least 4-6 weeks in advance of actual recital date.

___   Submit draft recital program to applied instructor for approval.

___   Submit recital program, via email, to MTD department secretary no later than two (2) weeks prior to recital for department chair’s final edit and approval. Note: If program is returned for corrections, the student must re-submit corrected program within 2 days (no exceptions). NOTE: Late submissions cannot be printed through MTD office. (see Appendix E, p. 43 for program template)

___   In consultation with applied instructor, choose recital jury committee.

___   Contact individual faculty jury members to serve. All jury requests must occur at least 3 weeks in advance of jury to ensure faculty availability.

___   Reserve venue for the recital jury.

___   Send recital invitations (family, friends, MTD faculty).

___   Secure student(s) for stage crew tasks at least 2 weeks prior to recital.

___   Inform stage crew about appropriate concert attire.

___   Provide stage crew with a copy of program, including all staging directions

___   Prepare advertisement posters, if desired (Student Affairs office must approve/stamp any posters prior to placement on University public bulletin boards across campus)

___   In consultation with applied instructor, coordinate dress rehearsal 1-2 days in advance of recital date. Stage crew should be present for dress rehearsal.

___   Arrange for reception, if desired

 

 

APPENDIX G

THEATRE PRODUCTION CHECKLIST

NOTE: See theatre program director for details specific to the individual student production. The general checklist below is for all production-related work handled through main MTD department office. 

Tasks below must be completed prior to the production-semester (e.g., for spring semester production, tasks must be completed in fall semester):

___   Select production date, in consultation with program director

___   Check venue availability with MTD office and formally reserve production space; When reserving the space          be sure to consider production date as well as all rehearsal and tech needs

___   Select/secure any other ensemble players, if needed (via invitation, audition, etc.)

___   Contact any other production personnel, if needed (lighting, stage crew, etc.)

___   Invitations

Extend invitations to MTD faculty. “Save the Date” announcement can be placed in faculty mailboxes. While some productions may have limited seating, it is important that seating accommodations be made for any University faculty member attending the production.

Tasks below completed within the actual production-semester:

This list enables MTD office to provide student with general assistance regarding final program printing and advertising.

___   Submit the production (playbill) program to Theatre Program Director for editing and final approval prior            to sending document to main MTD office

___   Submit the approved production (playbill) via email to MTD department secretary no later than two (2)              weeks prior to recital for department chair final approval (this is the last stop before printing the program)          If program is returned for corrections, re-submit corrected program within 2 days (no exceptions). Late            submissions cannot be printed through MTD office. (see Appendix E, p. 43 for program template)

___   In consultation with theatre program director, choose the faculty jury committee.

___   Poster Announcements. Prepare advertisement posters to be posted in public areas across campus. As              per University Student Affairs policy, all poster ads must be submitted to SA office for approval/carry                  stamp prior to placement on University public bulletin boards across campus. No exceptions.

___   Arrange for reception, if desired


Department of Music, Theatre & Dance | Sette LaVerghetta Center for Performing Arts
dept.mtd@maryu.marywood.edu | (570) 348-6268